Cracker by Damian Christie

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Cracker: Wallywood

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  • Islander,

    Nau mai ki Te Ao Marama e te pepe!Kia ora!
    All best to Danielle & Brent too!


    Um, quite a big babe....

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    God I love the end of that Bordwell piece.

    The review, professional or amateur, shouldn’t go extinct. But we also benefit from ambitious critical essays, pieces that illuminate movies through analysis and interpretation. Web critics could write less often, but longer. In an era of slow food, let’s try slow film blogging. It might encourage slow reading.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • B Jones,

    Congratulations, not that I expect Danielle to be here to receive them for a while.

    Let's tie it all in together by saying that from the point of view of a baby, a good book tastes interesting and doesn't give you papercuts on your tongue. A secondary consideration might be that it looks interesting when your parents wave it at you and make sounds.

    Also, Watership Down is great when you're too young to understand all the scary stuff. Thanks to the post above, we've now got a second generation of innocent bunny admiration.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 976 posts Report Reply

  • Stephen Judd,

    was there ever a book of that ongoing, deeply strange, strip he had in the Listener? I loved that...

    God yes that blew my teenaged mind. The one with the alien? Enjoy.

    (I love the incredibly detailed renderings of the backgrounds).

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 3122 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    ask and you shall receive dept...

    God yes that blew my teenaged mind. The one with the alien? Enjoy.

    Wahoo!! thanks for this, Mr Judd & Mr Langridge...
    ...and Mr Hodgson too, natch!!

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7953 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    I assume this is a compliment.

    Umm, yup sure, OK.

    I quite enjoyed PHIL 101 in my first year, until I realised halfway through that (for me) that it was all going to be silly discussions with no point. Happily never took it again.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • philipmatthews,

    it was all going to be silly discussions with no point

    No point? It's early days yet. We're only on p19. I'm sure we'll get this objective v subjective value thing nutted out one of these days ...

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2007 • 656 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Stephen Judd - O JOY! (And ka mihi koa ki a e hoa Langridge & -natch- Hodgson!) Wow!

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    No point? It's early days yet. We're only on p19. I'm sure we'll get this objective v subjective value thing nutted out one of these days ...

    It's always fun to drop in and sneer at the people who have an interest in these kinds of discussion, though, no?

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson,

    Happily never took it again.

    I envy you. It took me about 6 years to realize there was no point. And I still can't prove it.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10657 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie,

    Trace Hodgson

    was there ever a book of that ongoing, deeply strange, strip he had in the Listener? I loved that...

    Apart from Shafts of Strife (thanks Stephen Judd) there was The Television, which kind of faded out after a promising start. When he was on form, which was most of the time, Trace Hodgson was the badger's nadgers.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    There's those 'train journey' bits which are missing from the 'alien' strips...damn! I must brave the Rats and go upstairs and rescue - pieces...

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    It's like a thread taken over by a PHIL 101 tutorial group out of control.

    Stand still and put your hands in the air! This is a threadjacking! We're taking this thread to CUBA! Erm, I mean, ENLIGHTENMENT!

    Anyway, I'm only here for the argument.

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    No, but aren't you then saying that if my opinion being contrary to the consensus means nothing, then so does everyone else's opinion mean nothing, therefore even consensus (the balance of a group of opinions) also means "nothing"?

    Yes and no. Things only have the meaning we ascribe to them.

    A few hundred years ago, if you were the king, then even if everyone else in the group held a different opinion, your opinon being contrary to the consensus would make everyone else's consensus opinions worthless. Yours would be the only one that counted.

    Nowadays, your opinion has the same value as anyone elses. Dependent on circumstances society circumscribes it with, which are more or less arbitrary.

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    I mean, you're calling for different treatment of the two situations. I'm asking, what is the basis for the difference? (Don't just say "different context"; I mean the actual basis).

    I don't think I can answer that.

    In my opinion, different circumstances call for a different approach. How differnet the approach is depends on how different the circumstances are. The same approach may work well for a number of different circumstances.

    But that's just an arbitrary opinion, it's not an empirical difference.

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • 3410,

    Oh, no. Alex Chilton has died.

    RIP and thanks for the music.


    September Gurls

    Blue Moon

    Auckland • Since Jan 2007 • 2618 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    maintaining a spectrum of thought...
    from my onboard dictionary:

    THE RIGHT WORD
    When you give your opinion on something, you offer a conclusion or a judgment that, although it may be open to question, seems true or probable to you at the time (she was known for her strong opinions on women in the workplace).
    A view is an opinion that is affected by your personal feelings or biases (his views on life were essentially optimistic), while a sentiment is a more or less settled opinion that may still be coloured by emotion (her sentiments on aging were shared by many other women approaching fifty).
    A belief differs from an opinion or a view in that it is not necessarily the creation of the person who holds it; the emphasis here is on the mental acceptance of an idea, a proposition, or a doctrine and on the assurance of its truth (religious beliefs; his belief in the power of the body to heal itself).
    A conviction is a firmly held and unshakable belief whose truth is not doubted (she could not be swayed in her convictions), while a persuasion (in this sense) is a strong belief that is unshakable because you want to believe that it's true rather than because there is evidence proving it so (she was of the persuasion that he was innocent) .

    though when wrestling with ideas
    the oh pinion can be used to bind or
    hold someone down while you engage
    some spindly ol' pinion gear with the great grinding flywheel feathering one's flights of imagination - ergo cogitation!

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7953 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    The Big Chilton...
    RIP and BBC DJ Charlie Gillett too...

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7953 posts Report Reply

  • JackElder,

    Phil 101.... Happily never took it again.

    Disclaimer: I tutored both PHIL 101 and PHIL 106 at Vic in the late 90s. Then I realised that the career opportunities for a professional ethicist are extremely limited. Much less a professional meta-ethicist.

    If you're now wondering if you took one of my classes: I'm the one with the beard, if that helps.

    Wellington • Since Mar 2008 • 709 posts Report Reply

  • 3410,

    I'm the one with the beard, if that helps.

    Yeah, that narrows it down. ;)


    ...


    Children by the million
    scream for Alex Chilton
    .

    1987

    Auckland • Since Jan 2007 • 2618 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie,

    . . . some spindly ol' pinion gear with the great grinding flywheel feathering one's flights of imagination . . .

    "There's got to be more to life than fighting for fish heads!"
    Richard Bach, J L Seagull

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Simon Grigg,

    BBC DJ Charlie Gillett too...

    man, that's distressing, The Sound of the City was a life changer for me, a massive eye opener. Before I found that book as an early teen I simply had no idea about that exactly where that noise I was devouring came from. They didn't tell you that stuff in school.

    You can almost forgive him for discovering fucking Dire Straits..almost, but not quite...

    Just another klong... • Since Nov 2006 • 3284 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    You can almost forgive him for discovering fucking Dire Straits..almost, but not quite...

    I was gonna say that
    - I just thought it was too soon...
    But I guess there are some crimes against
    humanity you can never escape from...
    :- )

    Luckily we still have Trevor Reekie doing sterling work with Hidden Treasures on Sunday morning
    National Radio...

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7953 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    "There's got to be more to life than fighting for fish heads!"

    Seeing it's Friday...

    the extended art cinema version
    - music kicks in at about 2 minutes

    in a different universe we could have had
    The Flight of the Conger Eels...

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7953 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    It's always fun to drop in and sneer at the people who have an interest in these kinds of discussion, though, no?

    Oh that wasn't a sneer. :P

    If you're now wondering if you took one of my classes: I'm the one with the beard, if that helps.

    Ah no, I went to Otago.

    The lecturer (Colin Cheyne) was actually one of the better lecturers I ever had, he used to walk about the 150 or so students with a microphone and get the class to debate the issues. It was a great change from high school, it was the great debates of higher ideas that university promised you.

    Just the topics (and methodology) under discussion weren't for me. I wanted there to be a reasonable chance of some answers by the end of the course, philosophy seemed to present itself as finding as many way of coming to no conclusion.

    I happily went to history with its "here's what we think we know... BUT" direction :)

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

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