Up Front by Emma Hart

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Up Front: Absence of Malice

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  • Emma Hart,

    Ahh, isn't gin a depressant?

    From personal experience, I'd say gin is a gigglant.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4651 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    devil's advocaat

    I like that too. :)

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    With all due respect

    And I love the way people say that just before they're about to be disrespectful, in general.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    And I love the way people say that just before they're about to be disrespectful, in general.

    I've very occasionally used 'with all the respect that's due to you' instead.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4651 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    And there's the crux to me of the whole argument - what is due.

    I'd say the balance has shifted historically from a role demanding respect, regardless of the performance or personality of the incumbent, to it being earned in the execution of a role or the living of a life. Our grandparents have a very different understanding of respect than our children do.

    Mark, please do find some non-German perspectives on what mana means. At least re-read (re-spect?) Keri's brief post. It does encompass and shed light on a lot of what you were talking about.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    I'd say the balance has shifted historically from a role demanding respect, regardless of the performance or personality of the incumbent, to it being earned in the execution of a role or the living of a life. Our grandparents have a very different understanding of respect than our children do.

    Case in point: To anyone who whines about tall poppy lopping, what do Sam Morgan, Stephen Tindall, Lloyd Morrison and Peter Maire have that Rod Deane, Michael Fay, David Richwhite, and Christine Rankin don't? The former have earned respect, and the latter seem to think of it as a birthright.

    Here's some required reading (especially for economics students):

    Brian Gaynor piece from Granny Herald: Tall poppy status has to be earned

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5441 posts Report Reply

  • Robyn Gallagher,

    I've always thought that people who claim to be victims of "tall poppy syndrome" are those who, after having achieved some success, seem to think they should therefore be off-limits for any criticism, and conclude that the criticism is coming from people who are envious of them, not that they've done anything worth being criticised.

    Raglan • Since Nov 2006 • 1946 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie,

    I thought that in NZ a tall poppy was whoever a certain kind of taxi driver thought would make a better job of running the country than elected politicians. In the 90s I was told that it was the "Warehouse guy" - presumably Stephen Tindall. A decade later it was the "TradeMe guy".

    I've found that the best way to deal with taxi drivers who use their passengers as a captive audience to spruik the virtues of an appointed dictatorship of the elite is to point down a street that you happen to be passing and say something like "My cousin used to live down there." After that they usually leave you alone.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    point down a street that you happen to be passing and say something like "My cousin used to live down there." After that they usually leave you alone.

    How on earth does that work? In what city are you cabbing?

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie,

    How on earth does that work? In what city are you cabbing?

    I heard the "Warehouse guy" line from a driver in Auckland in 1997. To be honest, I've only tried the cousin line in Sydney. Delivered in a slightly "medicated" tone, it's a sure-fire conversation killer.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    I suspect the answer lies in the tone. :)

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Amy Gale,

    I cheated once in a test in form two. I happened to catch a glimpse of my neighbour's paper. His answer was different to mine and I thought he know more about the subject than me so I changed my answer. Turns out my original answer was correct all along.

    OMG totally snap, down to the "form two" and the "only time I have ever".

    (Except my neighbour was a "she, girls' schools being what they are.)

    The subject, even the question, are seared into my brain forever.

    tha Ith • Since May 2007 • 471 posts Report Reply

  • Isabel Hitchings,

    Disturbing is when you (and a friend obviously) are half-naked and getting sweaty in the back seat of a taxi and the driver still persists in attempting to engage your interest in the rugby.

    Christchurch • Since Jul 2007 • 719 posts Report Reply

  • linger,

    Possibly attempting to preserve the upholstery?

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1942 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Lolnui - linger, you are a joy.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    The subject, even the question, are seared into my brain forever.

    I've had a lingering belief in the power of silly ditties in memory ever since a 1989 Economic Studies test in which my friend and I conferred afterwards to check we'd got the same on the multi choice section.

    The answers to the six questions were C, B, D, C, C, D.

    Which I still remember because straight after the test my friend asked me "Did you get cabbage, banana, dog, cabbage, cabbage, dog?"

    Er, as you were.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Kerry Weston,

    Kyle? Oh, he's that cabbage cabbage dog guy on Public Address.

    ;-)

    Manawatu • Since Jan 2008 • 494 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    World Famous in New Zealand I am.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Amy Gale,

    I've had a lingering belief in the power of silly ditties in memory ever since a 1989 Economic Studies test in which my friend and I conferred afterwards to check we'd got the same on the multi choice section.

    Piano teacher, c.1982: Five Cats Got Drowned At Evans Bay

    PE (!) teacher, 1985 (years before actually needed): Harry HE LIkes BEer By Cupfuls Not Over Flowing

    Not to mention speech teacher, c.1980: Jabberwocky (the ultimate silly ditty).

    Seared. In. But can I remember where I put my car keys?

    tha Ith • Since May 2007 • 471 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    PE (!) teacher, 1985 (years before actually needed): Harry HE LIkes BEer By Cupfuls Not Over Flowing

    Having sat through three years of high school science, I find myself only ever able to remember the first dozen or so elements of the periodic table. I suspect the latter sentences of the memory tool weren't a very interesting story.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Isabel Hitchings,

    I can sing you the chant I learned of the symbols for the first 20 elements but couldn't tell you what the elements are or even which letters represent the sounds I'm saying
    Hydrogen heelee beebee k-noff...

    Christchurch • Since Jul 2007 • 719 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    I can sing you the chant I learned of the symbols for the first 20 elements but couldn't tell you what the elements are or even which letters represent the sounds I'm saying

    I didn't have a chant, but I was pleased to note that looking at

    Harry HE LIkes BEer By Cupfuls Not Over Flowing

    I still knew what those elements were.

    My brain has an astonishing ability to retain useless crap, like what US state particular towns are in. I do wonder if it wouldn't be good if there were some way to clean that out and use the space for useful stuff.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4651 posts Report Reply

  • Rachel Prosser,

    The answers to the six questions were C, B, D, C, C, D.

    I've long had a romantic notion that an english multi-choice test would have answers in sonnet form:

    A B A B C D C D E F E F G G

    It just appeals to the orderly bit of my mind.

    Christchurch • Since Mar 2008 • 228 posts Report Reply

  • Rachel Prosser,

    Oh, and Happy New Year everyone!

    Christchurch • Since Mar 2008 • 228 posts Report Reply

  • Rachel Prosser,

    Hmmm, now I'm musing - both posts above say I have made 91 posts on PA.

    Is this the 91st all over again, or the 93rd?

    Christchurch • Since Mar 2008 • 228 posts Report Reply

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