Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: Networking takes a back seat

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  • Socrates,

    Don't forget Moata a librarian from Christchurch

    Blog Idle

    Since Feb 2008 • 9 posts Report Reply

  • Tim Michie,

    Yeah. Went to the zoo with me nephew (3) last year and we had a great time. I'd not gone for years (too many mad polar bear in concrete bunker memories) but had caught The Zoo teevee thingy a few time. But I was really glad we both had a great time. And I discovered my nephew *really* like turtles. Who Knew? (Certainly not his Da.)

    Auckward • Since Nov 2006 • 614 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    Good on yer, Russell. You richly deserve such a break.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2560 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    too many mad polar bear in concrete bunker memories

    Oh my god, the pacing. The PACING. They still haunt me.

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Amy Gale,

    Best zoo experience evah was our 4th Form trip, during which one of Wellington Zoo's free range peacocks fluttered into the tiger enclosure and lived - or rather didn't - to regret it.

    Who knew teenage girls could be so bloodthirsty? Oh. Right. Everyone.

    tha Ith • Since May 2007 • 471 posts Report Reply

  • andrew llewellyn,

    Oh my god, the pacing. The PACING. They still haunt me.

    Have you seen Ardman's (the Wallace & Gromit people) Creature Comfort? If memory serves, it set interviews with the inmates of an old people's home against animated zoo inhabitants. It won an oscar.

    and gosh, here it is

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creature_Comforts

    Since Nov 2006 • 2075 posts Report Reply

  • Gervais Laird,

    Kookaburras are one of my favorite things about living in Oz. They generally hang out as couples and at dusk they patrol the edge of their territory (which for us means eventually sitting on the power pole outside our house) and laugh maniacally which makes my two year old boy crack up. And they are really smart. I remember watching a family carve up a prepared chook at a picnic at the beach with one stalking the roast chook from the powerlines directly overhead. It swooped down and nicked a half of the chicken once it had been carved, much to the hilarity of everyone sitting around the people who lost their lunch!

    Sydney • Since Jan 2007 • 14 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    Oh my god, the pacing. The PACING. They still haunt me.

    I have memories of a 1st form zoo trip flashing back here Danielle.

    Everything bad about zoos is rescued by them having otters. Most wonderful animals in the world, ever, and forever, by a mile.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Gervais Laird,

    Taronga zoo in Sydney has this great thing where kids and parents can stay overnight. Apparently you get to go behind the scenes and get special talks and see the animals feeding. Since a lot of the animals are nocturnal you get to see (and hear them) them during their waking hours which is apparently awesome. I'm looking forward to doing that with my son when he's a bit older.

    Sydney • Since Jan 2007 • 14 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Rowe,

    Love the zoo, we bought our eldest a friends of the zoo pass for his 4th birthday, so now it's a free day out for my wife and the three kids during the week.

    We once visited Antwerp zoo (pre-kids) because Brussells was so damned boring, and Auckland's is much better. Antwerp had a kiwi, kept in an outside cage. Obviously visiting during the day meant you were looking at an empty cage. I don't remember any big animals, but the sea otter was stuck in something little larger than a home aquarium (well, that's an exaggeration, but nothing like the seal enclosure here). Quite sad to watch him swim the same pattern over & over.

    Lake Roxburgh, Central Ot… • Since Nov 2006 • 574 posts Report Reply

  • daleaway,

    I watched a dingo giving birth in Taronga Zoo once. As the pups emerged, the other dingos were waiting ready to eat them.

    Went in search of a keeper to report this. "They do that", he said, and sauntered off in the other direction, for a fag.

    Unlovely animals. The dingoes, too.

    Since Jul 2007 • 198 posts Report Reply

  • Peter Martin,

    Since a lot of the animals are nocturnal you get to see (and hear them) them during their waking hours which is apparently awesome

    Indeed...the Singapore zoo puts on a night safari where one can be driven through the zoo or walk. Well worth it...great atmosphere.

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 187 posts Report Reply

  • Michael Savidge,

    Taronga zoo in Sydney has this great thing where kids and parents can stay overnight.

    I'm pretty sure Wellington Zoo do this on occasion...

    Somewhere near Wellington… • Since Nov 2006 • 324 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    I watched a dingo giving birth in Taronga Zoo once. As the pups emerged, the other dingos were waiting ready to eat them.

    Lol. Great family trip to the zoo that'd make. Children crying. Pregnant women traumatised, men with wide eyes. Everyone walking 10 metres away from the dingo enclosure for the rest of the day.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Damian Christie,

    I'm pretty sure Wellington Zoo do this on occasion...

    You've just got to be able to hide really, really well at closing time.

    The keepers at the Wellington Zoo take the cheetahs for walks, that's definitely worth seeing. I made a YouTube video a year ago that shows it very briefly (and other animal highlights). I'm surprised to see now that it's had 6,700 views!

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 1164 posts Report Reply

  • uroskin,

    "Bluetoothing the incisors". English is such a damn difficult language to master.

    Waiheke Island • Since Feb 2007 • 178 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson,

    I'm always amazed by people who don't like zoos.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10653 posts Report Reply

  • AndrewD,

    Could someone spare a thought for the mouse?

    On the topic of leaving dingoes to eat their young, it's the same attitude as the whole Knut the baby polar bear thing in Europe. To intervene or not to intervene. It's the same in the zoo as in politics and economics. And no-one's ever right.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2007 • 54 posts Report Reply

  • Bevan Shortridge,

    I went to Taronga Zoo in Sydney and spent some time watching seals. Eventually I looked at the notice for the animals and discovered I'd gone all the way to Oz before I had seen my first NZ fur seal in person. Somehow I had never seen one at home. Which is possibly quite sad.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 122 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    I love Auckland Zoo. I love the way you can go right up to the young male tiger, I like watching the spider monkeys, and I could happily spend a whole day watching the sealions from their underwater window. I must admit to feeling a little guilty about that one - their constant swimming and diving in their pool seems to follow the same pattern over and over again. And I thought of the polar bears, as Danielle says, pacing. But then I was lucky enough to catch them going through their behaviour enrichment thingies one morning, and I felt a wee bit better. If someone were to say the sealions are going mad, I would stop watching them. I really would. I swear. Just not yet.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3136 posts Report Reply

  • Joanna,

    I love the way you can go right up to the young male tiger

    In San Francisco, tiger comes right up to you!

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 746 posts Report Reply

  • Robyn Gallagher,

    I'm always amazed by people who don't like zoos.

    I'd always taken zoos for granted, but then one day I started thinking about exactly what zoos are for and I got a little bit creeped out.

    There are arguments that some animals in zoos are there because they are endangered species or at risk of being poached and so the zoo life gives the animal a better chance of reproduction and survival.

    But most of the animals in Auckland Zoo aren't endangered. They've been taken from their wild homes, transported to New Zealand for... For what? For our entertainment? Education? Amusement?

    Why do we need to see a giraffe in a pit in Western Springs to understand it? Why can a wildlife documentary not show the same?

    Are zoos are creepy relic of bygone era that we've attempted to make better in this modern age? And even if you give a rhino a nice African name like Mtoto instead of Charlie, what difference does that make if the rhino can't go for a run in whatever direction it feels like?

    Raglan • Since Nov 2006 • 1946 posts Report Reply

  • Raymond A Francis,

    I am with Robyn on this
    I have spent my working life with animals and I don't like see them caged
    The only exceptions might be endangered species getting a hand to up their numbers
    And just for the record I don't much like people keeping dogs cooped up in cities/towns either

    45' South • Since Nov 2006 • 577 posts Report Reply

  • Gervais Laird,

    Isn't one of the main functions of zoos the fact that they're places where scientists can go to actually study live animals without having to trek all the way to their habitat and the entertainment factor for the general public is merely the means that they get the cash to be able to support that important research. There's a moral justification if you need one the next time you're admiring the otters.

    Sydney • Since Jan 2007 • 14 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    And just for the record I don't much like people keeping dogs cooped up in cities/towns either

    I think it helps to include your dog in your daily activities so they are not left at home alone.I am lucky enough to take my dog to work with me and I don't think she would have it any other way. She also goes on holidays up north (her birth place) and loves the journey. I suspect Stella thinks the car is now hers.She is able to distinguish between cats at work that are "no go" and neighbouring cats that are fair game (for removal from our garden). I know she loves her inner city life,but I do stress ,inclusion is all they ask for,and, they will give you their all.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

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