Southerly by David Haywood

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Southerly: That CERA Rumour

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  • Isabel Hitchings, in reply to Lilith __,

    Or…Torchwood!

    If CERA could deliver us a John Barrowman there would be several happy Cantabrians (and also a massive bun-fight).

    Christchurch • Since Jul 2007 • 719 posts Report Reply

  • Megan Wegan, in reply to Isabel Hitchings,

    Didn't you get him in the massive dividing up of all men ever?

    (waits for Emma to come running and say "No! He's MINE.)

    Welly • Since Jul 2008 • 1275 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart, in reply to Megan Wegan,

    Yeah, I would not have let that happen. Also, all the people ever.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4651 posts Report Reply

  • Megan Wegan, in reply to Emma Hart,

    True. I believe you got Amy Pond, too. In fact, I think I ended up with one person, out of the whole world.

    Welly • Since Jul 2008 • 1275 posts Report Reply

  • Isabel Hitchings, in reply to Megan Wegan,

    In fact, I think I ended up with one person, out of the whole world.

    But you got him in multiple roles.

    Christchurch • Since Jul 2007 • 719 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Lilith __,

    Or...Torchwood!

    They may have had enough rifts already in Otautahi to last a lifetime

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19745 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    Re Paul Campbell’s post about boat-like foundations… “when the big one hits it’s ‘avast me hearties!’ and you’re off, for a metre or two.”

    That’s such a great image, especially if Jack Sparrow is at the helm.

    Enter The Crimson Permanent Assurance....

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7953 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia, in reply to Lilith __,

    Perhaps Auckland differs from Chch in that way? Here, some of the older suburbs are costly to live in, and some (like where I am) are really cheap.

    Nah - not that much. Russell knows better than I (it being his backyard and all), but I think it would be fair to say that gentrification hasn't come to a halt, it's just moved on a little. And that's not actually a bad thing for all the snark I do about the Herald being the Hustler of property porn. Gentrification has saved more of our "built heritage" from the ever-shifting tides of architectural fashion that we'd like to admit.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12370 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    Enter The Crimson Permanent Assurance

    Brilliant. That was the image conjured for me too.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19745 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    new CERA CEO Roger Sutton mumbled something about his vision for an ice skating rink in the centre of Christchurch, as a focus, it could be a paddling pool in the summer, a place for people to “gather”

    A paddling pool would be possible, an ice rink very difficult in Christchurch. Not cold enough for an outdoor rink, you'd spend ridiculous amounts of money to keep the ice frozen.

    Christchurch needs a second rink, but it would need to be covered.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Kyle Matthews,

    More Brinkermanship...*
    One Rink to Bind Them!**

    Rink is, as you all know, merely a
    contraction of that most fearful
    of interest-bearing compounds -
    Red Ink - which freezes anything
    o'er which it spreads or seeps...
    Don't take my word for it, the
    Gummint has been skating on it for years!

    *many Hans make light work...

    **the as yet unwritten LOTR sequel
    in which Christchurchshire is itself
    cast into the pit of More Ordure...

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7953 posts Report Reply

  • David Haywood, in reply to Kyle Matthews,

    You may not be aware that they had an ice-rink in Cathedral Square last winter (in a tent) -- it was brilliant, in my opinion.

    If you moved it 300 metres up Colombo Street to Victoria Square, you could use the Avon River as your heat sink. The Avon stays cooler than 8 deg C throughout winter, and the low heat rejection temperature coupled with the superior heat transfer properties of water (in comparison to air heat rejection) would make for about as efficient a refrigeration system as you could design for those conditions.

    Not necessarily endorsing the idea, but it's the first thing you'd think of as a mechanical engineer (as Roger Sutton is).

    Dunsandel • Since Nov 2006 • 1156 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to David Haywood,

    If you moved it 300 metres up Colombo Street to Victoria Square

    That would be clever, and I like all this "heat rejection" business! But Victoria Square is already pretty awesome, whereas Cathedral Square seems to have robust "awesomeness rejection" properties. Obviously the Cathedral is nice, and the Chalice, but once you've seen them, there's no reason to go back. We need to find something that will bring people, and encourage them to linger, and come again.

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3894 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz, in reply to David Haywood,

    London manages an outdoor ice rink, although it has slightly cooler average winter days and a lot less insolation.

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Sigh - still thinking that a mid-city BIG water feature can be a goer - and loving Ian D's pro-found word play-

    incidentally, there are supposed to have been/may -be?- 3 taniwha around the CHCH & Port Hills areas-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes, in reply to Islander,

    3 taniwha around the CHCH & Port Hills areas-

    And Boy, can they kick butt.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Ross Mason,

    Am I the only one who squirms in their seat when the notion of "beings" such as taniwha are raised to such a status that roads, bridges and whatever need to be bent to accommodate such inventions of the mind? Just sayin.

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1590 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Ross Mason,

    No Kai Tahu has ever done that Ross – we’d squirm at the idea.

    Which is not to say that that we dont respect the creativity & stories of our tipuna.
    They put earth-shaking matters into a framework that humans can understand.
    Indeed, like the story of Ruaumoko….

    I would point out that “beings” like gods still have a special protection under ANZ law – and churches/temples/synagogues etc. worshipping aforesaid “beings” are tax-exempt? Such ‘inventions of the (human) mind’ no more deserve special treatment than taniwha-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Campbell, in reply to Lea Barker,

    Re Paul Campbell's post about boat-like foundations... Do you happen to know if the idea ever gained ground, so to speak?

    Well I was just parroting something I'd read about houses being built on reclaimed land south of San Francisco (around the airport from memory) - so yes people are building like that - probably not a lot though, you might even need something like that to get building permits in some places these days.

    While there are the hulks of ships under the SF Marina and the Financial District I don't think that's the main thing down there - I think it's mostly dredge tailings from Bay

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 2622 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie,

    Am I the only one who squirms in their seat when the notion of "beings" such as taniwha are raised to such a status that roads, bridges and whatever need to be bent to accommodate such inventions of the mind?

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    Heh!
    When it suits eh?
    Whatever *it* is-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    You may not be aware that they had an ice-rink in Cathedral Square last winter (in a tent) – it was brilliant, in my opinion.

    If you moved it 300 metres up Colombo Street to Victoria Square, you could use the Avon River as your heat sink. The Avon stays cooler than 8 deg C throughout winter, and the low heat rejection temperature coupled with the superior heat transfer properties of water (in comparison to air heat rejection) would make for about as efficient a refrigeration system as you could design for those conditions.

    Let's just assume that I'm the PAS ice rink expert.

    Alexandra, Naseby and Tekapo have outdoor rinks, but they're all significantly colder than Christchurch over the winter. Alexandra just got ice down last night, Tekapo has had theirs for a couple of weeks, I think Naseby are still working on it. It's quite difficult to get water to freeze when it's not freezing cold in the air, and takes significant amount of electricity.

    A rink in a tent is not the same as an outdoor rink. The tent helps cool the air inside and limit the expenditure on keeping the ice frozen, but it's no longer outdoors, it's inside a tent. Completely different from the one that New York has that most people will think of.

    I wouldn't imagine you could use water as your heat transfer system, as the water needs to be below zero degrees to keep the rink frozen - typically about -5 degrees. Dunedin ice rink uses glycol as their heat transfer system.

    The heat that you take off the system tends to get used for two things - melting the snow that you take off the ice in the zamboni - you might take as much as 30 cubic metres off a day depending on how busy the rink is. Resource consent will typcially mean you can't just dump that, you need to melt it using the warmth off the cooling system and then into the drain.

    The second thing is that you need freezing pipes under the ice, but you need a ring of warm heat around the outside to prevent the ground outside freezing and warping - this distorts the whole structure and can be a disaster for ice rinks. If there's more than that you can use it for something else - Tekapo uses it to help keep their hot water pools going for example.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Ross Mason,

    I wouldn't imagine you could use water as your heat transfer system, as the water needs to be below zero degrees to keep the rink frozen - typically about -5 degrees. Dunedin ice rink uses glycol as their heat transfer system.

    I should let David answer this but....

    The "water transfer" that David talks about is using the Avon River water to dump the heat in the fridge system. Because it is only 8 deg C or so in the winter, the fridge that is doing the freezing of the ice will run more efficiently the cooler you can keep the condenser side of the fridge. (The bit that is the "hot" part of the fridge)

    But a more interesting option may be to allow all those houses that will eventually reside next to the Avon or the Heathcote the use of the water to extract heat to heat their homes. This would be via Heat Pumps. Which is the exact opposite to the ice rink problem. The warmer you can keep the condenser side of the Heat Pump (the part with the fan outside) the more efficient the heat transfer. One of the anomolies of Heat Pumps is that you need the heat on the coldest days. There ain't much heat in cold air so the efficiently plunges. Utilising the immense latent and specific heat of water would make a hell of a difference.to the power bill!!

    Here is the good bit. With the Heat Pumps cooling the Avon, there may be sufficient heat extracted to freeze it!!

    Lo!! A meandering Ice Rink!!!

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1590 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    At least ChCh still has an ice rink in one form or another. Wellington has been trying to sort out getting one since Phil Sprey's popular one-off outdoor rink in 2002. Welly Indoor Sports was the only taker for a permanent rink project, but pulled out after it and the council couldn't reach an agreement over costs.

    More here. And here.

    And in fairness, the council has acknowledged the issue.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5443 posts Report Reply

  • Ross Mason, in reply to ,

    None of the above. Certainly not a wee fuckwit christian. Rather a large fuckwit athiest.

    Such ‘inventions of the (human) mind’ no more deserve special treatment than taniwha-

    Fully concur. Whether they are tax exempt or not. I can't see the point of invoking any spritual "being" for anything frankly.

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1590 posts Report Reply

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