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  • BenWilson, in reply to Lilith __,

    I think grapefruit’s divine fresh

    Grapefruit has been contraindicated for at least 3 different medications I've been on.

    I did used to juice it and add something sweeter to it, like sugar or orange juice. But I do find juicing citrus to be a PITA.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10657 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Richard Aston,

    That’s how I restored a failing lemon tree , lemon trees it seems just loved to be pissed on. Same for orchids.

    I tend to pile lawn clippings under citrus, too. They don't like root competition, and it's a regular addition of nutrients that you've got to put somewhere anyway. Maybe 5cm deep spread right out to the drip line, which is the rough extent of the roots.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10657 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe,

    Root competition for the lemon tree: I hadn't thought of that. The lemon tree is in a fairly narrow strip between the concrete garage foundation and a dense, old lawn. I could shift a few plants and cultivate a bit more garden bed.

    I found an olive brining recipe that I saved years ago: similar to others posted though it stresses that plain -- uniodised -- salt is to be used.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to BenWilson,

    Grapefruit has been contraindicated for at least 3 different medications I’ve been on.

    Yeah, it's strong stuff. Interferes with hormonal contraceptives.

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3891 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to Russell Brown,

    There’s a song about sloe gin fizz …

    <3 that song. :-)

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3891 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Russell Brown,

    Bet you are happy to have harvested before the deluge.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Richard Aston, in reply to BenWilson,

    I tend to pile lawn clippings under citrus, too. They don’t like root competition, and it’s a regular addition of nutrients that you’ve got to put somewhere anyway. Maybe 5cm deep spread right out to the drip line, which is the rough extent of the roots.

    Me too Ben, lawn clippings are a fantastic mulch, put on fresh they seem to burn off the weeds - except kikuyu of course.

    Northland • Since Nov 2006 • 510 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Richard Aston,

    Me too Ben, lawn clippings are a fantastic mulch, put on fresh they seem to burn off the weeds - except kikuyu of course.

    Kept away from trunks so rot doesn't set in. And lots of hand-held watering to break down the piles. I have found that lawn clipping mulch also attracts flies, so under windows is not great.
    (Hah: gardening threadjack. Come on RB, you know you want to surrrender a corner. We'll leave the Feed alone; promise.)

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Rebecca Williams,

    +1 for a gardening blog!!!

    And so I'm not completely jumping on the threadjack, I'll post a great recipe for chilli tomato jam later ... promise.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2007 • 120 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Rebecca Williams,

    I’ll post a great recipe for chilli tomato jam later … promise.

    Will hold you to it. I made a cut down version of your sauce recipe. I just cut every ingredient down to 1/4 original. Tomato sauce was homemade (I'm currently drowning in them). It made maybe 800ml. Very nice indeed.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10657 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    I love chutneys and relishes. Just so you all know.
    And my birthday is soonish.
    So.
    Just saying.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3136 posts Report Reply

  • Rebecca Williams,

    Very impressed Ben! Talk about motivated :)

    Jackie we should hook up. I'm swimming in homemade sauces relishes etc. you are friends with Danielle right? Me too :) although largely on Facebook it must be said.

    Righto here's the jam recipe.

    CHILLI TOMATO JAM

    Makes 4+ pints (about two litres)

    Ingredients:

    5 lb / 2.25kg heirloom tomatoes, roughly chopped - any tomatoes will do

    2 small yellow onions, diced

    1 cup dark brown sugar

    1 cup white sugar

    Juice of 2 lemons

    1 green apple, finely diced (I use whatever apple I’ve got in the fridge).

    2 1/2 teaspoons salt

    1 teaspoon coriander

    1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

    2 teaspoon red chili flakes

    1 teaspoon ground ginger

    1 teaspoon smoked paprika (optional – I left it out cause the Hubster doesn’t like it)

    3/4 teaspoon cumin

    1/3 cup apple cider vinegar (any will do – I used red wine vinegar)

    Method:

    Place allingredients in a large pot or Dutch oven and stir to combine. Over medium heart, bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce heat and allow mixture to simmer, uncovered, for 2-3 hours, or until the jam is really dark and thick. Stir occasionally.

    Recipe doesn’t call for it but I transferred to a blender and gave it a good blitz. This means that you don’t have to bother getting the skins off the tomatoes before you start, and you end up with a lovely smooth jam.

    Transfer jam to clean, sterilized jars. If canning, boil jars in a hot-water bath for 20minutes. If storing in the refrigerator, the jam will keep for 2 weeks (or more).

    NB this is keeping in the cupboard for months in sterilized jars. My mother eats it with a spoon because she likes it so much :)

    Auckland • Since Mar 2007 • 120 posts Report Reply

  • Pete, in reply to Ben Curran,

    Would you like to post that venison and quince recipe perchance?
    I have some aged venison in the freezer that needs to be treated right

    Since Apr 2008 • 106 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Pete,

    Aged venison (and this hurts because we've been bossed in trial vegetarianism by the teenagers):

    Saw into thick little steaks , or if backstraps (you lucky man) sear whole in hot pan until preferred doneness. Remove meat. Add 1T wholegrain mustard per person, splosh of verjuice/pomegranate molasses/apple cider vinegar, then about 1/4 cup of cream per person. Bubble until thick. Or more healthily, heat mustard + liquid then take off heat and stir in very thick plain yoghurt, heat gently; do not overheat or bubble or it will split. Serve with whatever; especially good in New World bakery olive and garlic loaf, a rough sourdough or a proper baguette.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe,

    My discovery of early summer: flag making elderflower syrup, lovely as it is, in favour of fresh elderflower water. Less -- or no -- sugar and just as fragrant. Pick half a dozen or so heads of elderflower in the morning, put in large jug with a litre of just-boiled water and some maple syrup or raw honey (or not -- doesn't need sweetening) and lemon or lime juice. Cover and leave to sit on the bench covered for an hour or two, then add ice and enough cold water to make 2 litres. Keep in the fridge and drink undiluted.

    Elderflowers are reputed to be help alleviate hayfever. It is easy to grow a few bushes in a wild corner by planting a cutting; they spread easily. In later summer the berries are worth making a syrup too.

    The berries and flowers can be frozen whole until you deal with them. It is best to process the day you pick. This year I picked a colander full of berries and left them in the kitchen 24 hours -- they started to ferment and go mouldy in that short time.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Richard Aston, in reply to Rebecca Williams,

    +1 for a gardening blog ... me too

    Northland • Since Nov 2006 • 510 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to Hebe,

    fresh elderflower water. Less – or no – sugar and just as fragrant. Pick half a dozen or so heads of elderflower in the morning, put in large jug with a litre of just-boiled water and some maple syrup or raw honey (or not – doesn’t need sweetening) and lemon or lime juice. Cover and leave to sit on the bench covered for an hour or two, then add ice and enough cold water to make 2 litres. Keep in the fridge and drink undiluted.

    Wow, that sounds GREAT!

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3891 posts Report Reply

  • Chris Waugh, in reply to Hebe,

    Elderflowers are reputed to be help alleviate hayfever.

    +1 for an alleviating hayfever and other ailments blog. We're just moving into that season up here and chrysanthemum tea is good for many things, but has never helped my hayfever or asthma, despite the advice of a friend who studies Traditional Chinese Medicine. Now, bad luck with the dictionaries (nciku used to be really good....) suggests I should try some wikipedia language-switching trickery before I can figure out if elderflower can be found in China.... Aha!*

    ETA: and it is indeed available here. Must try. Thanks for the tip.

    *A translation trick for when a word isn't in any dictionary. Search the term on Wikipedia in L1, then scroll down through the language options on the left sidebar until you find your target language, click that, and presto. Never use translation software - among other things, it doesn't give you the option of double and triple checking through things like pictures and the latin names.

    Wellington • Since Jan 2007 • 2401 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Chris Waugh,

    Hay fever: my best remedy (out of all the drug/non-drug/vitamin/jiggery pokery of all sorts that I have tried) is one from Dr DC Jarvis, a US doctor from Vermont who wrote "Folk Medicine" in 1958. The book culled his experience and folk medicine remedies that he had seen to work. He was particularly keen on the use of apple cider vinegar, honey and kelp.

    A caution for this remedy: definitely do not use if you are allergic to bee products or propolis or cannot eat honey for some other reason.

    His hay fever remedy: get honeycomb cappings, or honeycomb (or honey if nothing else). Make sure it is as local as possible (for the pollen types I guess) and raw (unheated). Chew a tablespoon of the wax/honey for five minutes. Spit out the residue. Repeat every hour, for a total of five hours. Repeat three times (ie three five-minute chews) a day, or twice if that works.

    I have had miraculous results with this and so has most everyone I have told who has done this. All my symptoms -- running eyes and nose, ear infections, itchy and rashy skin, fatigue (like being under constant assault) went by the end of day one. I start the chewing as soon as the first snivel and prickle appear. I could do it all year with no ill-effects. And it's relatively cheap!

    I bought an old copy of the book on TradeMe for $5, so they are easily available.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Richard Aston,

    Called Seed, or Weed? And the parenting one: Breed?

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Chris Waugh, in reply to Hebe,

    Thanks, Hebe. Having seen the state of the nearby seas, I think I'll avoid kelp until we're back in NZ. Vinegar, well, we've got lots of good stuff, but the best is from Shanxi Province, not far away - the only question is if the Shanxi people do with their vinegar what they do with their Fenjiu (the local spirit), and keep the best stuff for themselves, exporting only the second rate stuff at best. As for the honey remedy for allergies, it seems to make a lot of sense, and fortunately if we take the old road over the mountains to and from our village (which we almost always do) we drive past quite a few beekeepers with hives and honey for sale on the side of the road, so it may well be worth stopping and asking them... Will try. Thanks again.

    Wellington • Since Jan 2007 • 2401 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Bart Janssen,

    mellow yellow...

    Urea is basically nitrogen fertiliser.

    Now there's the solution for dirty dairying - lemon tree plantations betwixt bovine benefactors and streams...

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Hebe,

    Called Seed, or Weed?

    'Dig it all' - surely?
    ; - )

    We arrived back yesterday to the start of our annual Feijoa carpet...
    I've found a box at the gate, marked Freeijoas does the trick !

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    Dig It! Cutting it?

    Freeijoas; perfect. What variety? I'm thinking to plant a hedge of them this year. Unfortunately for the blueberry hedge, Nina did some gardening.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

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