Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: Interesting Britain!

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  • Ray Gilbert, in reply to Moz,

    And with the help of Teresa May, they're both trying to leave the Cons in government but with a slim majority and possibly dependent on the LibDems for support (or, like National having the option of asking for supply from The Greens

    The last dalliance the LibDems had with the Tories was an unmitigated disaster, so I can't see them formalising anything. On the other hand it ids difficult to see how an alliance of all parties against the Tories would have any long lasting future either.

    It would be good to see for a short time though even if it only to see Donald Trump denied his chance to ride in the carriage with the Queen.

    Since Nov 2006 • 104 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Ray Gilbert,

    On the other hand it ids difficult to see how an alliance of all parties against the Tories would have any long lasting future either.

    I guess it would come down to whether they were competent in what they did. It's not really that hard of an ask. They could just, like, govern, represent, etc. From memory, even the British Parliament was once capable of those things.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10650 posts Report Reply

  • andrew r, in reply to Tom Semmens,

    Exactly !!!!!!
    Amazing how utterly drab,dull, staid, and actually *wrong*Labour centrists are looking about now.
    Why even the author of this site may have been wrong in bowling with the centrists.

    auckland • Since May 2007 • 99 posts Report Reply

  • Martin Brown,

    I do like the way they have all the candidates on stage for the result to be read formally by a local official - like a village flower show.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2013 • 137 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz,

    Labour take Battersea.

    I think we are seeing something of a political realignment, where the more affluent middle classes support a left-liberal party while the proletariat is increasingly drawn to populism. Of course, the actual personnel of the right-populist parties are incongruously posh.

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Martin Brown,

    cruel fete

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19706 posts Report Reply

  • william blake,

    Mays’ sociopathic rant re. terrorism being mitigated by getting rid of the UN human rights convention, probably did more harm than good, in preaching to the isolationist choir. Locking people up with no evidence does flag your party as fascist and gives swing and ‘missing’ voters something to vote against.

    Since Mar 2010 • 380 posts Report Reply

  • simon g,

    Why are we wasting time finding out how people voted? Mike Hosking knows.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1329 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to simon g,

    I'm never clicking that. You could have rickrolled me into it, if you'd not mentioned Draco Fanboy.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10650 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Thing we probably didn’t expect to see: Scotland possibly saving the Tories.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to andrew r,

    Why even the author of this site may have been wrong in bowling with the centrists.

    Corbyn's run an excellent campaign and May a historically awful one. He appears to have motivated people to vote – and his extremely beige position on Brexit was clearly the right one electorally, given that far more shed UKIP votes seem to be going to Labour than anyone expected. It's hard to credit now that it's only slightly over a month since Labour had a fairly ghastly result in the local council elections.

    But I don't really resile from my misgivings about Corbyn's performance as Opposition leader for much of the time he's been in the job. He was really bad at some of the basics.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz, in reply to Russell Brown,

    He was really bad at some of the basics.

    Perhaps that's intrinsic to making a radical change - he isn't playing by the *rules*.

    I'd suggest that any of the Blairite candidates would have done considerably less well yesterday.

    The main thing if issues with is Corbyn's support for Brexit - perhaps after this election, the opposition (I don't see Labour getting a majority) will coalesce behind advocating an alternative to the Tories bandwagon and offering an alternative (around fast-track negotiations with the EU) as their programme becomes obviously hopeless.

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • Ken Double,

    Here's some chortlicious commentary on the commentary.

    Wellington • Since Dec 2012 • 119 posts Report Reply

  • Luke Williamson, in reply to Russell Brown,

    Maybe it's hard to concentrate on the job of opposition leader with so many knives in your back, front and sides. I'm really enjoying this now as it creeps closer to a Labour victory – fingers crossed.

    Warkworth • Since Oct 2007 • 297 posts Report Reply

  • Sam Bradford,

    Corbyn was bad at 'the basics' because he was being kneecapped by his own MPs from day one. How he was supposed to do his job in those circumstances I don't know. The amazing thing is, he's not a good politician in any traditional sense -- but he's won over swathes of new voters just by not being a craven chump.

    I do hope this is another nail in the coffin of the shadowy ideology some call Blairism, beloved by none except careerist Labour MPs and newspaper columnists. I do hope this marks some kind of generational shift towards higher expectations of politicians. I also give thanks, once more, for MMP, without which we'd be probably be living in the same kind of permanent Tory twilight that afflicts the UK.

    New Zealand • Since Jul 2014 • 30 posts Report Reply

  • Ray Gilbert, in reply to Sam Bradford,

    I’d suggest that any of the Blairite candidates would have done considerably less well yesterday.

    Couldn't agree more. I suspect that is a major part in the drop in support for the SNP. After overcoming a rather staid early years (Scottish Tories as my old girlfriend from Fife called them 20 odd years ago) the SNP seem to be a good home for idealistic and socially aware young people. With the loss of the referendum for Scottish independence and the appearance of a Labour leader who is speaking around social justice these voters are likely placing their faith with Labour for the first time or returning. They wouldn't have considered that move if the old guard Blairites were still at the helm.

    Since Nov 2006 • 104 posts Report Reply

  • andrew r, in reply to Russell Brown,

    'I don't really resile ...' Bless, that's a tiny bit of humble pie - that'll do.

    auckland • Since May 2007 • 99 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz, in reply to Ray Gilbert,

    It's to be noted that the SNP will still (per the Grauniad) be expected to have a majority of the Scottish vote - as they had in the Scottish Parliament election.

    There is a (smallish) sectarian majority in Scotland who believe that independence will lead to their being forced to say the rosary and give allegiance to the Pope. It's one of those 15th century echoes they have in parts of Europe. I think those people, along with the Posh Scots, have settled on the Tories.

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Rich of Observationz,

    I’d suggest that any of the Blairite candidates would have done considerably less well yesterday.

    Not that we can actually know, but Jeez it would be nice if the speculation about it could just end. It's like Labour here having a Clarkite faction.

    It is nice for the Corbyn faithful to have a lot to be happy about, but it's also far too early for post-mortems. There could still be a May government negotiating Brexit, however much my entire twitter feed is calling her demise. From what I can tell, the Tory vote % has also increased, 5.6% at the moment. They've lost seats, for what reason I don't know, but presume it's to do with FPP and vote splitting, but still have the biggest party and a strong chance of making a coalition.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10650 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Semmens,

    short of actually winning, this is the near perfect result for Labour. Maybot is last month bot, and the Tories will seek guidance and succour from.....

    BORIS JOHNSON!!!! HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!

    So Labour can watch the Conservatives twist in the wind under that moron, wrestling with Brexit and the NHS, until the inevitable election in 12-18 months that they are very well poised to win.

    BTW, 71% of the youth vote went to Labour, which was almost exactly reversed in favour of the Tories in the over-65 vote. Britain is one seriously age-polarised society.

    Sevilla, Espana • Since Nov 2006 • 2214 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Sam Bradford,

    Corbyn was bad at ‘the basics’ because he was being kneecapped by his own MPs from day one. How he was supposed to do his job in those circumstances I don’t know. The amazing thing is, he’s not a good politician in any traditional sense – but he’s won over swathes of new voters just by not being a craven chump.

    Can't argue with that.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Aaaaand ... it just officially became a hung Parliament.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

  • Zach Bagnall, in reply to SHG,

    remember postal votes are about 25% of the total, not included in exit polling.

    They seem to have screwed up postal voting for this snap election. I received my voting papers TODAY, having confirmed overseas postal registration over a month ago. Neither I nor my wife were able to vote in time. Heard similar stories from others, even some living in the UK.

    There hasn’t been a snap election since postal voting became widely available in 2000, I can only assume they were not prepared for it.

    Very interested to see what the final turnout number is for postals in this election vs previous and vs booth.

    Colorado • Since Nov 2006 • 120 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Zach Bagnall,

    You couldn't go to the Embassy to vote?

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10650 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Interesting observations from the BBC coverage:

    - The Tories' 43% share of the vote is only just shy of the 44% that secured landslide victories for Blair and Thatcher.

    - The 40% won by Labour is more than Blair achieved in one victory.

    The key is the ravaging of the other parties. As ever, FPP militates against political diversity and new entrants to the process.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

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