Hard News by Russell Brown

Read Post

Hard News: All Change

107 Responses

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 4 5 Newer→ Last

  • Alfie, in reply to steven crawford,

    That’s not good...

    Have a read of the Drug Foundation's policy proposal Steven. I'd like to believe some of that thinking will inform our future drug laws.

    Damn, but I love this new wind of optimism that's blowing through our little country.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1326 posts Report Reply

  • Jonty, in reply to BenWilson,

    Great letter, Ben, which echoed my own thoughts on the result. Regarding MMP, the vile Hosking, who couldn't conceal his anger and disappointment at the result, is relentlessly bleating on about doing away with MMP. He began, fatuously, putting the boot in immediately after Jacinda's first speech as PM because it didn't include cabinet positions. How his surly arrogance is ignored by his bosses at TVNZ is beyond me.

    Katikati • Since Mar 2007 • 102 posts Report Reply

  • Ray Gilbert, in reply to Jonty,

    Hosking is also getting headlines in the Herald website including Breaking News banners earlier in the morning. Tha's the last straw for me TBH. When an news organisation considers the rantings of Hosking breaking and headline news over the content of a new govenrment coalition then I'm not interested. I've deleted my link and removed my app so I don't need to deal with any more BS from them in the future.

    Since Nov 2006 • 95 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Ken Double,

    Attachment

    Zimmer(frame)Man

    Whither the pensioners?

    There's an iceberg* coming to take them all away
    ha haaa
    to a farm where life is beautiful all the time
    ha haaa
    Go with the floe...

    *A68A

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7480 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Jonty,

    How his surly arrogance is ignored by his bosses at TVNZ is beyond me.

    It's not ignored. He is popular, so they play him, for ratings. I can't see it lasting, shrill outrage is not going to make his fan base giggle at the discomfort of his female co-hosts anywhere near as much as cocksure arrogance has.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10504 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz,

    Seems to me a job that needs doing is to require that TVNZ ensure that presenters of, or reporters on, news programmes or programmes about current affairs, are seen to be impartial.

    Here, I found you a code of practice you can cut and paste. Shouldn't take too long for whoever's Broadcasting Minister?

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5539 posts Report Reply

  • Neil,

    The water tax has gone.

    Still cuts in immigration planned.

    Pragmatism: +1, idealism: -1.

    Seems odd, why punish people who want to come here but not multinationals taking advantage of free water.

    Since Nov 2016 • 142 posts Report Reply

  • Ianmac,

    On one blog last night a number of members turned to watch Hosking because of the entertainment of his expected meltdown. He delivered! A Caricature of Hosking. Very very funny if you like that sort of humour.

    Bleneim • Since Aug 2008 • 135 posts Report Reply

  • Stephen R, in reply to Ianmac,

    On one blog last night a number of members turned to watch Hosking because of the entertainment of his expected meltdown. He delivered! A Caricature of Hosking. Very very funny if you like that sort of humour.

    I went to see Waru last night, and the bit with the Mike-Hosking-Analog was such a horrible person that I wanted to punch him in the face. But then, the real Mike-Hosking is a sufficiently horrible that I just turn off the media device when I encounter him.

    So, pretty close to true life then.

    Incidentally, Waru is pretty fantastic. Powerful, and heart-rending and I enjoyed the 1 cut per story arc limitation (though I found myself distracted sometimes by wondering "how did they do that? Did they have someone with a steady-cam holding on tight to the front of the car?"). If you get the chance, go see it.

    Wellington • Since Jul 2009 • 254 posts Report Reply

  • Katharine Moody, in reply to Alfie,

    Looking at a photo of the National cabinet earlier this week I thought, “I despise almost every single one of these people.” It would be hard to find a bigger collection of liars and self-interested pricks who don’t give a damn about our country. Thank God that’s finally changed.

    What makes me most ecstatic is that as a nation we won't have to listen to lies, denials and obfuscation any more.

    I hope Jacinda moves from Let's Do this - to Let's Own this. What a refreshing change in Parliament that would be.

    Palmerston North • Since Sep 2014 • 760 posts Report Reply

  • sandra,

    I was leaving an early evening performance at the Tauranga Arts Festival last night (on until Oct 29, since you ask) when a stranger in front of me, a 30-something man in a suit who'd been looking at his phone, turned round and said "I don't know if it's good news or bad news for you but Jacinda Adern is prime minister". I would have put money on Winston jumping the other way, old cynic that he is. The things I've seen/heard/read him saying, such as: "Capitalism must regain its human face ...", fill me with - almost unbelievably - hope. Goodness knows what lies ahead, but yesterday and today seem like we're starting in the right place.

    tauranga • Since Dec 2011 • 70 posts Report Reply

  • Rob Stowell, in reply to Jonty,

    How his surly arrogance is ignored by his bosses at TVNZ is beyond me.

    At the very moment I stopped caring about Hosking's bias and bloviation - which suddenly seemed ineffectual and almost enteratining - you want to get rid of him?!

    Whakaraupo • Since Nov 2006 • 2063 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Ianmac,

    On one blog last night a number of members turned to watch Hosking because of the entertainment of his expected meltdown. He delivered! A Caricature of Hosking. Very very funny if you like that sort of humour.

    I watched some of it this morning. It was priceless.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22227 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to steven crawford,

    The Greens leader just said “it’s time to move to a regulated market”. That’s not good, if it’s anything like the current alcohol market, with its promotional marketing practices. Cannabis has a high dependency rate, and it fucks some people totally up.

    I think everyone knows not to do it like alcohol. Officially the referendum is on making personal use legal, so there'll be a fair bit of room to move.

    We'll take lessons from Colorado – where state authorities have been quite alert to their emerging market and prepared to adjust the rules as required – but likely follow Canada's cautious approach to legalisation and regulation.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22227 posts Report Reply

  • Neil,

    I’m not sure why Labour want to spend money on an inquiry into mental health. The money would be better off spent on the obvious needs – more staff and more housing suitable for the various needs of people with mental health issues.

    Since Nov 2016 • 142 posts Report Reply

  • 81stcolumn,

    Like @TouchMyPoly I’m delighted at the prospect of three free years of Tertiary study. Anything that makes education more accessible is good with me. I look forward to having more peeps actually show up for class (yes I said that).

    But we at Ivory Towers Inc. are still a little apprehensive.

    Speaking selfishly, all the love has gone to teh studnets.

    This should bother everyone:

    “He said the tight budget could also force cuts in academic staff in fields where student numbers are declining, such as arts and education, although there could be staff increases in expanding courses such as engineering.”

    Which came from here:

    Cheapest university fees hit $6000 a year, via @nzherald http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11933635

    Last year the “Market model” of HE bit hard. There is the possibility that while students wait for free fees it will bite harder. When permanent staff are made redundant, in important, but unpopular areas of study, NZ loses academic capital and capability. We lose the how, the experience and we are unable to bring in new ideas. I don’t work at the School of Ed. At AU but I sure as f**k would miss it if it wasn’t there.

    In the long run this will affect us all. Broadly speaking, the chronic under funding of HE needs a fix that does not rely on student poverty, which is evidently unsustainable.

    Consequently, I love the change in Govt. but am mindful of what I have wished for.

    PS. No National Standards or Charter Schools FTW.

    Nawthshaw • Since Nov 2006 • 787 posts Report Reply

  • Neil,

    The biggest restraint Labour will face is not a lack of knowing what mental health services to offer but how to deal with a world wide shortage of mental health professionals.

    It’s a well known problem. One can promise more mental heath services but getting the right people to implement that is going to be the hard part.

    Even under current funding there are a large number of unfilled positions.

    They need a plan for that not an inquiry.

    Since Nov 2016 • 142 posts Report Reply

  • 81stcolumn, in reply to Neil,

    Where Psychology is concerned the NZPS need to grow up and step up.

    Nawthshaw • Since Nov 2006 • 787 posts Report Reply

  • Neil, in reply to 81stcolumn,

    It's such a large area. Stretching from the sort of thing you're referring to all the way to the continuing problems of deinstitutionalisation from decades ago. There's quite a number of now elderly chronic mentally unwell people who would have been better off in institutional care and need community support that is not there.

    Since Nov 2016 • 142 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Newshub got the Greens' portfolios:

    Climate change and associate finance are both expected to go to Greens leader James Shaw.

    The Greens will also have conservation, women and land information portfolios, and associate roles in environment, transport and health.

    They will fill a newly created undersecretary role, focused on sexual and domestic violence.

    Good stuff.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22227 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Russell Brown,

    We’ll take lessons from Colorado – where state authorities have been quite alert to their emerging market and prepared to adjust the rules as required – but likely follow Canada’s cautious approach to legalisation and regulation.

    That's a point. We do have those to study, and at least this new government are likely to listen to expert recommendations.

    And, how cool it is to start feeling proud to be a citizen of the shaky islands. Well done us for electing a reasonable government.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 3865 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to steven crawford,

    And, how cool it is to start feeling proud to be a citizen of the shaky islands. Well done us for electing a reasonable government.

    An Australian take from David Rowe.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4523 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    Cup of Datura tea?

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 3865 posts Report Reply

  • Prudence, in reply to Neil,

    It's true there does need to be money spent on staffing and services which are woeful at present, but the inquiry is what those that were abused by the system want. They have asked for it. They deserve it.

    New Zealand • Since Jun 2016 • 10 posts Report Reply

  • Caleb D'Anvers, in reply to 81stcolumn,

    Last year the “Market model” of HE bit hard. There is the possibility that while students wait for free fees it will bite harder. When permanent staff are made redundant, in important, but unpopular areas of study, NZ loses academic capital and capability. We lose the how, the experience and we are unable to bring in new ideas

    Yes. I actually think the new government would be better off essentially borrowing Corbyn’s tertiary fees policy and fast-tracking their elimination. A lot can go wrong very quickly during a lengthy transitional phase in funding arrangements.

    I’ve been pretty shocked over the past year or so to hear about potential academic staffing cuts in long-established, highly regarded Arts departments due to falling enrollments. Aside from the clear (and no doubt deliberate) disincentive to take “non-commercial” courses that the high fees regime evidently creates, this also leads me to wonder what’s been going on under National at secondary level. Is the secondary curriculum directing students towards vocational or professional courses and away from the arts and humanities?

    But, yeah. I very much understand the apprehension. In the UK, scrapping tertiary fees would only work for academics if the corresponding block teaching grants were immediately restored at a viable level so as to compensate for the loss of income. If universities’ ability to raise revenue via fees were taken away and not replaced by, at the very least, equivalent direct government funding, then the results could be bleak for academic staff. Then again, were the market model dismantled, there might be less pressure on universities to spend so much money on shiny new buildings and student services, so perhaps there'd be a change in emphasis.

    London SE16 • Since Mar 2008 • 482 posts Report Reply

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 4 5 Newer→ Last

Post your response…

Please sign in using your Public Address credentials…

Login

You may also create an account or retrieve your password.