Hard News by Russell Brown

Read Post

Hard News: A dramatic and unremarkable decision

61 Responses

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 Newer→ Last

  • steven crawford, in reply to Alfie,

    Would that be Pedantic with a capital P Steven? Seriously?

    Yes way, seriously, else everyone keeps getting mixed up about the difference between science and voodo 4eva

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4411 posts Report Reply

  • Ross Bell,

    Wellington, NZ • Since Nov 2006 • 175 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie, in reply to steven crawford,

    While medical use should not be confused with recreational, I think the healing plant involved deserves some credit.

    You can rebrand venison as cervena, but inside it's still Bambi.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1434 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Alfie,

    Yes but what if we started talking about doctors boiling up opium plants as medication, rather than calling what It is - carefully prescribing morphine and codeine in accurate dosages?

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4411 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie, in reply to steven crawford,

    Yes but what if we started talking about doctors boiling up opium plants as medication, rather than calling what It is - carefully prescribing morphine and codeine in accurate dosages?

    Say what? Wait for big pharma to produce a branded product without the c-word in the name? I suspect I'm missing whatever point you're making Steven.

    Meantime, here's a rather moving little NatGeo film (21 mins) showing some cancer and epilepsy kids benefiting from CBD.

    http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/magazine/150515-ngm-medical-marijuana

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1434 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Alfie,

    I suspect I’m missing whatever point you’re making Steven.

    You certainly are missing the point!

    Why do you think it’s politically difficult for pollititions to allow the use of CBD as a medication?

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4411 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie, in reply to steven crawford,

    Why do you think it’s politically difficult for pollititions to allow the use of CBD as a medication?

    As cannabis has a successful 5,000 year history as a medication, I'd have to say our politicians are more influenced by an outdated US policy designed to halt the flow of Mexicans into the states in the 1930s. Wouldn't you?

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1434 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Ross Bell,

    Dunne Speaks

    I think it would been more helpful if he hadn't, tbh.

    He actually didn't need to go charging around with a firehose.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to Russell Brown,

    He actually didn't need to go charging around with a firehose.

    But, he's a politician.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie, in reply to Russell Brown,

    Dunne Speaks
    I think it would been more helpful if he hadn't, tbh.

    He appears to make his view on those who call for decriminalisation pretty clear... they're best ignored.

    Some have hailed this week’s decision as the start of a “sensible” discussion of drug policy. I am deeply suspicious of that pejorative approbation – those making that call are invariably cannabis legalisation advocates, best ignored as just one more vested interest.

    While some people undoubtably take a "single issue" approach to drug reform, it's sad that Mr Dunne blithely dismisses their ability to show compassion when it comes to a treatment of last resort for a sick child.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1434 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Alfie,

    I’d have to say our politicians are more influenced by an outdated US policy designed to halt the flow of Mexicans into the states in the 1930s. Wouldn’t you?

    That's the origin, but now they are probably influenced by the local opinion polls.

    The difference between legalising get stoned from smoking dope, and using CBD as a medication, is muddy. Because, bad communication about the science.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4411 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie, in reply to steven crawford,

    Because, bad communication about the science.

    Agreed.

    I believe access to medical cannabis would benefit a lot of people -- those who suffer from crohn's disease, glaucoma, etc. For that reason I can't help but see Dunne's decision having a positive influence on public perception towards medical MJ in general.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1434 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Alfie,

    I believe access to medical cannabis would benefit a lot of people

    You did it again.

    OK let me put it like this. I believe that people should be alowed access to cannabis for medicinal use. But what just happened on the news, wasn’t about that. It was about getting access to a suffisticated drug that isn’t actualy cannabis. But becouse it’s been extracted from a dope plant, it’s got a weard stigma that makes polititions superstitious.

    I just think it’s important to talk about these sorts of things with care. But y’know I am the sort of child who pulled my toys apart, trying to find out what makes them tick:)

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4411 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to steven crawford,

    . I believe that people should be alowed access to cannabis for medicinal use.

    Me too, there's an even stronger argument for that than the already very strong argument that cannabis should be allowed for non-medicinal use. It's already being used in a massive way in this country, and those who want to use it medicinally instead of getting stoned should have the option not to have to break the law and get stoned as well, just to get access to the medicinal properties. My poor old great-aunt that recently died of cancer used for the first time in her life to help get through the shocking pain. It seemed a bit silly that she had to go through all the bullshit of making a connection, surreptitiously hiding her baggies and toking it up through a bong when a damned pill could have been prescribed.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10650 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to BenWilson,

    It seemed a bit silly that she had to go through all the bullshit of making a connection, surreptitiously hiding her baggies and toking it up through a bong when a damned pill could have been prescribed.

    And with the prescription there would have been medical oversight, to check the dose was optimal or it was compatable with other medications. And if for example, the doctors client had a history of mental illness, the doctor could prescribe CBD, not raw cannabis, if appropriate.

    And if a doctor prescribed ‘cannabis’ to someone when they where in a comma…
    Need I say,? that’s not how it works.

    And the law about recreational use, is another nother thing again, again.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4411 posts Report Reply

  • Kay, in reply to Sofie Bribiesca,

    Hi Sofie, sorry I'm a bit late in on this thread. Re your question about them being able to operate to remove the part of the brain that's causing his seizures:
    Surgery is only an option for a very small group of people with uncontrolled epilepsy. The seizures have to be proven by very intense testing to be originating from a specific part of the brain, and even then that's got to be a part of the brain that can be cut out without causing severe damage to senses/mobility etc. In NZ all the testing and surgery in done at Auckland Hospital so if that were an option for Alex I suspect by now it would've been investigated. If the seizures are generalised, ie they start with and affect the whole brain then surgery is never an option.
    I hope that helps with your question.

    Wellington • Since Apr 2014 • 10 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Here's one for Steven Crawford to ponder.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz, in reply to steven crawford,

    And if a doctor prescribed ‘cannabis’ to someone when they where in a comma…

    Well, better that than in the colon..

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Kay,

    I hope that helps with your question.

    Thanks for that, Kay.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to BenWilson,

    My poor old great-aunt that recently died of cancer used for the first time in her life to help get through the shocking pain. It seemed a bit silly that she had to go through all the bullshit of making a connection, surreptitiously hiding her baggies and toking it up through a bong when a damned pill could have been prescribed.

    If I'm ever in her position, I hope the law is more sensible by then. I'm not sure if it needs to be a pill even. One of the benefits of legalisation in Colorado (and of California's less-well-regulated medpot scene) has been the availability of does-exactly-what-it-says-on-the-label strains of marijuana. There'd have been one for her – ideally as an edible.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Sofie Bribiesca,

    Here’s one for Steven Crawford to ponder.

    Sofie, I rest my case.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4411 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to Kay,

    Thank you Kay. I had read about the surgery somewhere and know that all options would be considered. It will be fantastic if Alex has some help from Elixinol though. I would suggest now ,if that is not helpful, his family could seek other derivatives from Dunne.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Mike O'Connell,

    Some positive news through this morning - Alex has opened his eyes and is responding to voices! The Elixinol is supposed to be arriving today too.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/69333788/Teenager-in-coma-opens-eyes-responds-to-voices

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 385 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    There are some interesting ethical issues with interventions for people in a coma. Sometimes they can give retrospective consent after they recover. So it is not just the treatment that is controversial, but also the fact that the patient is not competent to consent.

    This is the sort of topic which will be discussed by ethics nerds at the upcoming Australasian Association for Bioethics and Health Law conference in Wellington.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3214 posts Report Reply

  • Angela Hart, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    It would be nice if they would also consider what constitutes genuine informed consent. I have been in the situation where my daughter was seriously unwell such that she was not thinking straight and was unable to retain what she was told, in a hospital HDU. She was taken to have given informed consent for various medications and treatments including a change of cardiologist and I was not informed except in terms of her telling me what little she could remember having been told. ( I was excluded from Doctors rounds because of privacy issues in a several bed HDU)This was lip service to informed consent and yet was taken as totally acceptable by the medical staff. I don't think Doctors necessarily understand what informed consent actually is. It's sometimes quite convenient to try out some stuff without having to go into the pros and cons-- but also extremely risky for the patient. I won't be excluded from an HDU or an ICU ever again without security being called.

    Christchurch • Since Apr 2014 • 614 posts Report Reply

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 Newer→ Last

Post your response…

Please sign in using your Public Address credentials…

Login

You may also create an account or retrieve your password.