Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: One man’s Meat Puppets is another man’s Poison

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  • philipmatthews,

    I think in this context, we need the Gordons. The other Gordons (brought to my attention by Paul Litterick):

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2007 • 656 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to Jackie Clark,

    the pull up to the bumper thing - which may be overanalysing it somewhat, since Jones herself says that wasn't what it was about.

    It's a pity she doesn't offer an explanation of what she did mean!

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3891 posts Report Reply

  • philipmatthews,

    And Christian rock? Once, searching for "Let My People Go", I came across this. Big in Germany ...

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2007 • 656 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle, in reply to Jackie Clark,

    Jones herself says that wasn’t what it was about

    Riiiiiiiight. I bet if you quizzed 100 people you know on those lyrics, 99 of them would say it was about that. (The hundredth person would be my mother.)

    ETA In fact, I'm doing a survey on Facebook as we speak regarding this issue. Because: c'mon.

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to George Darroch,

    And trying to understand punk

    Punk, in my opinion, is way over-analysed. What was there to understand? I sat in my family's suburban living room in 70s Christchurch with my Mum and Dad and watched a TV doco about Dylan Taite going to London to examine a shocking new music with weird-looking followers. The parents harumphed and disgusted and nonsensed their way through it. I was riveted; the Sound talked to me and FU'ed the parents and all the rest of the hoary old pop rubbish I was hearing. Best of all they hated it. So what was a girl to do? Sawed off the spiral perm to a Twiggy crop, find a miniskirt, fluorescent pink jersey and plastic sandals. It was so much fun, and so easy. and after of three or four years the music calmed down, and I grew up, and people who took it too seriously wrote books about it. Teenage rebellion, pure and simple.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Lilith __,

    Spine-chilling.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace, in reply to Jackie Clark,

    Interesting piece by Brian Easton about the significance of poem/song Jerusalem in NZ politics and culture.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3226 posts Report Reply

  • Biobbs, in reply to Ross Mason,

    Led Zep Rules!!!

    And no Stairway!!!!

    Don't speak too soon.

    The River Mouth, Denmark • Since Jan 2011 • 114 posts Report Reply

  • philipmatthews,

    Dolly Parton version?

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2007 • 656 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Biobbs,

    That's the first time I've ever found Rolf Harris funny. Now this is a definite self-harm song for me ( I want to make it stop before it has started):

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Lilith __,

    It's a pity she doesn't offer an explanation of what she did mean!

    reading the brief original source cited from Wikipedia, it's not that ambiguous (sorry, Danielle's mum):

    And, perhaps predictably, the star was asked about the meaning behind her top 20 hit which includes the line “grease it/spray it/let me lubricate it” which is widely thought to be all about anal sex.

    But Jones, aged 60, laughed off the idea. “I don’t think it’s necessarily about that. I think it means whatever you want it to. Because I kind of like the doggy position myself, but that doesn’t mean it’s going up me arse.”

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Scott Chris, in reply to Fooman,

    For some reason I prefer this version:

    LoL

    Auckland • Since Feb 2012 • 167 posts Report Reply

  • Simon Grigg, in reply to Scott Chris,

    I think Punk possibly had the most impact on mid-teens with no prior convictions... of the musical sort at least. ;)

    I'm gonna argue with that. By the time punk arrived (late 1976) I was twenty one or so and schooled in years of all sorts of musics - from rock'n'roll, lots of jazz, soul, ska - through to the then contemporary prog which was pretty much the soundtrack of the times.

    The day I bought the first Ramones album, I also bought Phil Manzanera's perfectly constructed proggy 801 Live. The latter had a few cursory plays, the first completely changed my life.

    I was ringing people and asking them around to hear it. It gobsmacked.

    Each to their own, but I instantly heard more that I could relate to in the opening 1-2-3-4 of Blitzkrieg Bop than I'd found in all the Yes or ELP albums I owned.

    And I don't think I was alone - there was a global sense of 'thank fucking god' when those early records arrived - you only need to look at the music press of the time. Quickly, music became exciting again and people started to push the boundaries. Punk opened the door to electronica, to post-punk experimentalism, dub, interesting pop, independent recording and so much more. No longer did you need to be a self-important pseudo-virtuoso, instead you simply could.

    And very many did.

    In New Zealand there was a time pre-punk, when for years virtually nothing was happening, to a time when there were literally hundreds of inspired performers -- some older like Phil Judd - and many younger, making music in a way we'd not seen since the 60s.

    It completely changed the way we made, wrote, recorded, consumed and released music.

    Just another klong... • Since Nov 2006 • 3283 posts Report Reply

  • Simon Grigg, in reply to philipmatthews,

    That's the first time I've ever found Rolf Harris funny.

    Even funnier - the Rolf version was the hit in the UK.

    Just another klong... • Since Nov 2006 • 3283 posts Report Reply

  • Scott Chris, in reply to Sacha,

    which has a lot to do with cultural context (unless you're some sort of modernist).

    Fair enough. If you want to be fair, which of course I don't. Let's just say relative to the pop genre.

    Auckland • Since Feb 2012 • 167 posts Report Reply

  • Simon Grigg, in reply to Hebe,

    punk, in my opinion, is way over-analysed.

    I've just done that for you I think :)

    Just another klong... • Since Nov 2006 • 3283 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle, in reply to Sacha,

    Well, Wikipedia summarises that as 'Jones revealed that the meaning of the lyrics was not meant to be interpreted in a sexual context.' I think we might have to play the arse card (so to speak) on the Wikipedia entry writer. Pfffft.

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Biobbs, in reply to Kumara Republic,

    We're well aware that Bruce Springsteen is a 62-year-old gentleman farmer from rural New Jersey but we also expect him to persuade us that he is a hormonal twenty-something grease monkey on a runaway American dream.

    With his latest album Wrecking Ball, I liken it to the grizzled veteran who's come out of retirement to get angry again.

    Great album. I really love his laid-back stuff from his later years too, "Girls In Their Summer Clothes" just has one of those 'timeless singles' feelings about it.

    I really just don't get opinions like the "The Word" one Geoff quoted above. It's not like Bruce was always 62 years old and wealthy, he really did grow up amongst the oil refineries of New Jersey, the son of a bus driver and a secretary. Whether people like his early albums or not is a matter of opinion, but it's a lie to say they weren't honest and authentic descriptions of his background at the time he recorded them. Yes, OK, he became wealthy because people liked his music, but he also changed his style after that and recorded other kinds of songs.

    The River Mouth, Denmark • Since Jan 2011 • 114 posts Report Reply

  • Simon Grigg, in reply to Biobbs,

    Yes, OK, he became wealthy because people liked his music,

    But not for years. His royalties and recording contract were frozen for years by CBS because of legal disputes. He mostly didn't get paid until about 1980.

    Just another klong... • Since Nov 2006 • 3283 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Danielle,

    we might have to play the arse card (so to speak) on the Wikipedia entry writer

    I didn't check the Edit history to see if your mum has been tinkering :)

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Simon Grigg,

    Phil Judd

    probably the first punk-influenced track I remember.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    I don't think they are being judgemental about Bruce but just suggesting that the first encounters with our music heroes create the personas which persist. I like how he shows real anger in his latest release for it is wonderful when people grow more radical as they get older, rather than less.

    And the Chiefs won again tonight, in a great game against the Waratahs.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2560 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Jackie Clark,

    I think he's referring to the pull up to the bumper thing - which may be overanalysing it somewhat, since Jones herself says that wasn't what it was about.

    Ahem. She's saying it wasn't necessarily arse sex, but I think there can be no possible debate what that song is about.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • Biobbs, in reply to Simon Grigg,

    That's the first time I've ever found Rolf Harris funny.

    Even funnier - the Rolf version was the hit in the UK.

    As the top-rated comment on the YT video says, is there any song that can't be improved by a wobble board? :-)

    The River Mouth, Denmark • Since Jan 2011 • 114 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Simon Grigg,

    I've just done that for you I think :)

    Hey I agreed with your analysis, so it's okay
    ;-)

    there was a global sense of 'thank fucking god' when those early records arrived

    Exactly. Something alive and ours was here. And the records had to "arrive", a month or six weeks from ordering to receiving, unless you knew someone working in a shop (University Bookshop or the one in Colombo St) who could play you stuff and tell you when there was something new in.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

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