Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: The uncooling of the inner West

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  • Sacha, in reply to BenWilson,

    think there was a real dynamism, a sense of people actually in control of their society and shaping as they liked. They consciously chose to live in poor areas and improved them because the liked something fundamental about the character of the areas, as well as liking the prices.

    I don't know how the change came about, though.

    Houses went from being mainly homes in a social setting to mainly investments in a portfolio. Financialisation.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19707 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Tinakori,

    Current prices are probably more a function of various planning policies and transport issues

    And fiscal policy settings.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19707 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Amanda Wreckonwith,

    A massive fall in property values would do that. Or the suburb becoming very undesirable to the wealthy. Or government intervention to build houses for sale at below market rates.

    None of which is going to happen, not at anything like the level we're talking about.

    So why do you want to condemn them to these draughty, damp, cold houses where you can hear your neighbour fart?

    I'm not sure where any of your ideas about what I want come from. I'm simply talking about something that was. You seem to think I am saying we should return to it. I'm not, that's impossible. But can we acknowledge that something unique was lost along the way?

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10650 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Amanda Wreckonwith,

    Or maybe the smell of smugness will become so nauseating that these suburbs will become uninhabitable…

    You're not really making for an atmosphere conducive to discussion with that kind of comment. That was barnaclebarnes you quoted, not me, btw.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10650 posts Report Reply

  • Amanda Wreckonwith,

    But can we acknowledge that something unique was lost along the way?

    I'd settle for misplaced

    Since Sep 2012 • 171 posts Report Reply

  • Jim Cathcart, in reply to BenWilson,

    Why is it not going to happen? Because it hasn't in the past? How about Japan where it has happened in the most densely populated cities on the planet? One of the issues is that nobody has any idea what will happen. One of the issues with house prices is that they're now so high relative to household income. A fall in values of up to 20% caused by a financial shock (such as a GFC MKII) followed by 10+ years of flat prices or deflationary pressure would bury the NZ economy and the banks. Interest rates would be close to zero and the dollar would be under pressure (OK, good for exports but hellish for imports).

    Since Nov 2006 • 228 posts Report Reply

  • bob daktari,

    only way to maintain some character outside of what house and garden and the investor classes copy as this seasons fashion is to retain what little social housing there is in the suburbs and for new developments including multilevel places to include a percentage of low cost/social housing

    Diverse neighbourhoods are what made these inner suburbs so fun and "cool" - added bonus those whom have done well retain some connection with the lot of the masses, possibly engendering some empathy for those our economy doesn't favour

    auckland • Since Dec 2006 • 540 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to bob daktari,

    Diverse neighbourhoods are what made these inner suburbs so fun and “cool” – added bonus those whom have done well retain some connection with the lot of the masses, possibly engendering some empathy for those our economy doesn’t favour

    While I probably shouldn't, I'm reminded of the bit in The Great Gatsby about the Long Island beer baron who, in order to enhance his prize view, offers to pay his neighbours' rates if they'll thatch their roofs.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    for new developments including multilevel places to include a percentage of low cost/social housing

    A notion our freshly re-elected PM described as “economic vandalism” when planned for the current Hobsonville Point PPP. Don’t hold your breath on that front.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19707 posts Report Reply

  • bob daktari, in reply to Sacha,

    Won't be holding my breath on progressive polices nor action on this or many other fronts don't worry

    auckland • Since Dec 2006 • 540 posts Report Reply

  • linger, in reply to Sacha,

    our freshly re-elected PM

    and (by that token) self-confessed economic vandal [just on the basis of his chosen image as "state house kid", not his career as currency (t)ra(i)der]

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1929 posts Report Reply

  • fraser munro,

    hmm - so many disparraging comments about ranui.

    Bet you lot living in the inner suburbs dont realise were subsiding your rates increases do you :-) . (we pay a 'rates adjustment levy' to ease your 10% increase)

    But i will be the first to agree that if all youve seen of it is the 80s infill flat lands then you will have the same view expressed in such shows as outrageous fortune and some of the comments here.

    As one poster here pointed out its really several small, quite different areas lumped into one. For instance you can see rangitoto and the harbour from my north facing front deck, the local party flat (cmon - theres always one) is reasonably infrequent and considerate, theres no marauding street gangs, very little tagging and the street is full of retirees, young couples and urban professionals who dont have the coin for the inner suburbs.

    go 2 minutes up the hill and its epic views of, well, everything - and character houses on acre sections

    Theres way more there than what you might think - shame on your drivers seat judgements as you whiz through to bethells :-)

    ranui • Since Nov 2014 • 14 posts Report Reply

  • Sam F,

    Welcome and cheers for that - I'm just about sold (almost literally a few years back, as mentioned upthread). It's just a teeny bit far for me to go with transport options to the city, as it stands right now anyway. You must be up near Don Buck Hill with a view like that I suppose?

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1609 posts Report Reply

  • fraser munro, in reply to Sam F,

    Hi Sam F.

    nah - other side. Were on the hill to the south of the railway tracks that looks north towards don buck. Ranui heights we call it (ha ha ha)

    As someone who poo pooed ranui when we were looking to buy (mainly because i had only driven through the flat lands) we have been very pleasantly surprised, both when we bothered to look at the house and how the move has panned out.

    And if you drive around the fringes of ranui the amount of new, and very expensive development is eye watering.

    ranui • Since Nov 2014 • 14 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to linger,

    and (by that token) self-confessed economic vandal [just on the basis of his chosen image as “state house kid”, not his career as currency (t)ra(i)der]

    INTERMISSION
    With all due respect. as much as I always believed NZ was something special and Aux was pretty cosmopolitan, I'm now of the view, after seeing the News and Campbell Live tonight that our Despot tinpot PM has dragged us down to being just another Country beholden to other. We now have more information given by All Blacks than Our Despot. We now go to that man constantly without question, as we are told hungry kids are a "not so many" and Experts prepared to enter Pike River Mine are not allowed whilst a couple of potentially dangerous guys are the calling for entering a War we have no understanding of or right to interfere with. I mean ,it's all very nice to talk real estate but truly ,the Herald can do that any day of the week. Yes rates are up, and I'm getting out because Auckland to me is a surreal expense, but we are going into War and for all those who think it's just like Afganistan, it really isn't. John Key is the most dangerous man we have ever had in power. People need to be hounding the Greens NZF and Labour about the danger he is putting us all in. We have to try save our Country.
    But ,hate to interrupt, as you were.... :(

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Sofie Bribiesca,

    We have to try save our Country.

    Thank you Sofie, today is Parihaka day.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Shulgin,

    just checked..that fat bastard hatred...

    the export was tom gould ....a NZ talent..he made and directed the action bronson video about seeing shit that doesn't exist...fuck these wavy comments from bank bitches...

    NZ • Since May 2011 • 125 posts Report Reply

  • Sam F,

    just checked..that fat bastard hatred...

    the export was tom gould ....a NZ talent..he made and directed the action bronson video about seeing shit that doesn't exist...fuck these wavy comments from bank bitches...

    Huh? Please tell me I'm not the only one completely confused by this element of the thread...

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1609 posts Report Reply

  • nzlemming, in reply to Sam F,

    Huh? Please tell me I’m not the only one completely confused by this element of the thread…

    You are not alone.

    Waikanae • Since Nov 2006 • 2933 posts Report Reply

  • jh, in reply to Amanda Wreckonwith,

    Culture is organic. It thrives on change not stagnation.
    .........
    And maturity and depth.

    Our multiculturalism has given Vancouver a wonderful variety of ethnic restaurants. There are two minimal requirements for the survival of a quality ethnic restaurant: chefs with expertise in the preparation and serving of its particular food and an appreciative clientele sufficiently large for its owners and employees to prosper. If either number drops below a critical value the restaurant may fail. If enough restaurants of a particular genre fail, the food genre vanishes. When the number of knowledgeable chefs and clientele is small the food culture is very vulnerable to invasion and cultural drift. For example, only a slight change in either the number of good Afghan chefs or aficionados of Afghan food could result in the disappearance of Afghan food from our city.

    Moreover, when the restaurant culture caters to a large number of small groups it is vulnerable to cultural invasion. One wonders if our small ethnic coffee bars can survive the Starbucks invasion, if quality French restaurants can survive the onslaught of Italian food, and if jazz and ethnic music can survive the rock music roller coaster. We lost the accordion to the rock guitar, and almost lost the trumpet and saxophone as well.

    But there is still another possibility, and it is the one I worry about the most. It is possible for the ethnic chefs to be mediocre and for their customers to lack sophistication in taste.

    If this were the case restaurant diversity would remain, but most restaurants would be mediocre. However, we wouldn't know it. To return to the accordion, such a scenario would mean that we would have some accordion players and teachers. They would be poor accordion musicians, but we wouldn't know it.

    I claim similar logic applies to cultural traditions, such as Scottish and Ukrainian dancing, bonsai and haiku, as well as playing the accordion. A high level of proficiency in arts such as these takes up to two decades to develop. The proportion of any group with the talent, energy, and determination required to achieve the level of performance required to maintain them at a high level of achievement is small.

    http://www.gunghaggis.com/2007/10/21/accordions-multiculturalism-and-the-evolutionary-psychology-of-charles-crawford/

    Since May 2007 • 103 posts Report Reply

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