Public Address Word of the Year 2009

148 Responses

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  • Danyl Mclauchlan,

    Also,

    Tinkerblog: Noun. A blog or other commentator who writes endless variations on the same fantasy in the hope of making it true; eg. climate change is not happening, the National government is deeply unpopular.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 927 posts Report Reply

  • George Darroch,

    Raceing, Beach raceing

    A sport popular among many New Zealanders. Involves flogging a dead horse, usually on the foreshore. See also trotting carnival, a regular event at Bowalley Rd.

    WLG • Since Nov 2006 • 2264 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Liked Gareth Morgan's description of the 2025 report
    "Doorstop by lunchtime."

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Jason Dykes,

    Obama

    Copenhagen

    W-shaped recession

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 76 posts Report Reply

  • Gordon Paynter,

    Supercity

    Wellington • Since Dec 2007 • 21 posts Report Reply

  • Gordon Paynter,

    And how could we forget... parental correction.

    Wellington • Since Dec 2007 • 21 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    Honi soit qui mal y pense

    Honte is shame, certainly. As a french speaker, I would say it was what Craig said. It literally means "Shame be who thinks ill thereof". So, yeah.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3136 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Hone soit qui mal y pense.

    That, sir, is inspired.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    WemustcatchupwithAustralia

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • JLM,

    Supersorry

    Judy Martin's southern sl… • Since Apr 2007 • 241 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Cope n haha agen.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Amy Gale,

    Can we have a parallel vote for phrase of the year?

    Stephen's nomination of it's knowledge, bro is an excellent one.

    I'm also extremely partial to bourgeois legume patties and normal people don't do that kind of shit and so aren't aware of the other meanings.

    tha Ith • Since May 2007 • 471 posts Report Reply

  • Sam F,

    It tastes like X I've made myself. It tastes good.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1609 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    Wait, wasn't it bourgeois legume croquettes?

    In any case, Amy's proposal is seconded. With a follow-up vote for a priori conception of falafel.

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Sam F,

    That thread was a classic. Was it really as recent as August? The mind boggles.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1609 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    By way of comparison, the Global Language Monitor words of the year were.
    1. Twitter
    2. Obama
    3. H1N1
    4. Stimulus
    5. Vampire.
    Top phrase is 'King of Pop'.

    Used in a sentence that's;

    'Twitter Obama gives H1N1 stimulus, and Vampire is King of Pop'.

    Which is almost funny, sort of, if you squint... Too soon?

    And finally, one more for top phrase. 'No we can't!'

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • Heather W.,

    Phrases:

    "It's not a good look"

    "animalistic penis-brains (APB)" (c/- Danielle/Tess Rooney)

    Word:
    intertextuality

    North Shore • Since Nov 2008 • 189 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    Oh Heather, thanks for remembering animalistic penis-brains! I was trying to call it to mind the other day and couldn't for the life of me.

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Tony Parker,

    From my perspective the word(s) of the year are unfortunately National Standards.

    Napier • Since Nov 2008 • 232 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    Swine flu/piggy flu/h1n1

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Webber,

    I quite liked “bikoi”. The word just sounds natural and elegantly describes a hikoi on bikes. For a cross-language graft, it hangs together well.

    As for the philosophy of the inaugural bikoi, that hangs together less well. Riding a motorbike carries with it a very high probability of an accident that leans heavily on the health system, so a decent insurance premium seems justified. Which reminds me of a word I first heard in Perth in 2008-ish: That bloke diving up gap between two lanes of traffic (or otherwise driving his bike recklessly) is a “tah”… from “T.A.” for “temporary Australian”.

    Since Nov 2006 • 18 posts Report Reply

  • Stephen Judd,

    Riding a motorbike carries with it a very high probability of an accident that leans heavily on the health system, so a decent insurance premium seems justified

    Not in a universal system that insures rugby players, skydivers, trampers, ... we're all in this together, mate.

    Personally I think it's the thin end of the privatisation wedge. Of course you want to accustom people to being segmented and paying higher premiums before chunks of risk pool are sold off. No doubt the highest-risk, uninsurable people will be left to the state.

    Note, I don't ride a motobike.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 3122 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    Riding a motorbike carries with it a very high probability of an accident that leans heavily on the health system, so a decent insurance premium seems justified.

    And I don't disagree with you. But turning round and saying 'oh, by the way, you'll be paying 400% more next year for the privilege' is not exactly the right way to go about winning friends and influencing people.

    Plus the boundaries have been set by taking into account engine size only, with no attempt to relate these to the actual power generated, or overall configuration of the machine.

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    As for the philosophy of the inaugural bikoi, that hangs together less well. Riding a motorbike carries with it a very high probability of an accident that leans heavily on the health system, so a decent insurance premium seems justified.

    If any group of motorists deserve to be pinged with higher ACC premiums, it should be the Hartley-Moores and Tony Friedlanders of this world. And also of course, anyone with an inferiority complex (shrimps who drive hulking V8's come to mind). Not likely to happen in a hurry though, since turkeys don't vote for their own Thanksgiving.

    Personally I think it's the thin end of the privatisation wedge. Of course you want to accustom people to being segmented and paying higher premiums before chunks of risk pool are sold off. No doubt the highest-risk, uninsurable people will be left to the state.

    Want to close the loophole? Then look no further than re-opening the litigation floodgates to any privatised accident insurance system. Then insurers will go, "Ohh stuff it, we're not going to make any money out of this." It'll be messy, and maybe Machiavellian to boot, but it'll remind people why ACC was formed in the first place.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5441 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    Riding a motorbike carries with it a very high probability of an accident that leans heavily on the health system, so a decent insurance premium seems justified.

    There is still debate over accountability, but being a Scooterist, I'll declare a conflict and move on. Still, you can only ride one motorbike at a time, so is it fair when someone has a collection of motorbikes for them to have to pay the levy multiple times?

    This is a topic for a whole different discussion.

    'Bikoi' Gets my vote.

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

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