Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: Illegal Highs

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  • Shulgin,

    If I could be particular again.

    ....media outlets are awash with bunny ears, and, small rodents...right after the Easter rush...apparently various parties are saying they would not allow testing on animals....flash back to the Naenae shop...they sure looked like animals,,,but were cast as dogs... off the chain (cam bell live) I don't have a tv or freeview...so that's just an impression i got reading some other animals account....

    anyway...the rabbits are a bit pissed.....(off)... and will now stand guard outside liquor outlets...canvasing the other two legged animals...as they leave...sir are you intending to consume all that gin, sav and merlot...you just have the t=standard drink in a hourly session...."fuck you bunny"

    flash back to experimental mice pushing levers....and injected monkeys....

    roll bell sounds so sensible, but will do, as his funding depends on it...he sounds like an expert...update your web site on animal testing ross...I have seen you in some compromising poses with cops and MOH officials...I love parteas....anniversary cakes and shit,,,is that you with a stu mills? yuck two bunnies together...cross hares..

    in the annual dipton bunny shoot...we find a candidate...who had werked for phillip morris...no animals were used...sort of situation....but you kill people actually...so why are you the spokesperson and running for parliament?

    So the this whole situation is a joke...despite the flamouant grey haried cumming back after refusing to release his e-mails...he stood in a whale terd...up to his bunny ears....

    if only fish were like bunnies then shane jones could comment....

    ....and quan quay said under his watch...no cannabis reform....just give the animals rabbit food....



    anyway, rabbit ears has given way to freeview,

    NZ • Since May 2011 • 125 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Graeme Edgeler,

    hopefully we'll know in 20 working days or so

    amen

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Shulgin,

    that wins some prize for density of references

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Graeme Edgeler,

    You need to contrast between those sent to prison for drug possession alone, and those sent to prison for burglary and drug possession or receiving stolen goods and drug possession.

    Why does he need to contrast that? They are still serving time in prison for drug possession. Beginning and end of the story of people being in prison for drug possession. If this was not against the law, they'd be out of jail sooner. The amount of time spent in jail for cannabis is a real thing, real people's lives rotting in jail over something millions of NZers have done regularly. By all means wait 20 days to find out how much of a distinction that is, but Bomber's point stands - a lot of people are doing time for dope possession. They didn't get extra time for the booze found in their house.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10657 posts Report Reply

  • Shulgin, in reply to Sacha,

    thank you!

    NZ • Since May 2011 • 125 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Shulgin,

    respec

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Michael Homer, in reply to BenWilson,

    If this was not against the law, they’d be out of jail sooner.

    Concurrent sentencing doesn't work that way. Two years for X plus one month for Y is two years in total.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 85 posts Report Reply

  • Shulgin,

    NZ • Since May 2011 • 125 posts Report Reply

  • debunk,

    British test method these days is to pay volunteers (probably do here these days too) to stay in "controlled" medical environment and take drugs and have physiological measures sampled ..blood, BP, liver function etc ..some get very sick but that`s what they`re paid for and have signed a waiver contract for. Only way that I can see a proper test being done with a standardised set of measures. Free board and food for participants and make some money. Better than animal studies and 'subjects" get to try the product. And they are all said to be 'harmless' after all..soon find out. If patients in psychiatric wards are currently free to leave hospital and supplement their "treatment" with Legal Highs, and enthusiasts of this law are sure it is moral panic driving the protest, the test awaits!

    New Zealand • Since Aug 2012 • 105 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to Michael Homer,

    Concurrent sentencing doesn’t work that way.

    But consecutive does.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Shulgin, in reply to debunk,

    fuck off...just give us the acid...happy to participate...markets testing markets...monitor all vital organs for failure...fuck off de bunk

    NZ • Since May 2011 • 125 posts Report Reply

  • Shulgin,

    Ross,,,i sent you a letter about cops fiddling figures....you never replied...and that is the line in the sand...by all means make out you know shit...and fab picture moments...about your herstory...ugly...grasping moments...by all means be snapped next to D I MIlls...but be sure to do the rounds with him....60,000 bed nights and $30 million a year cost to tax payers.....cake? anyone?

    NZ • Since May 2011 • 125 posts Report Reply

  • Shulgin,

    at the end o f the day...i can buy trips in china....white powder legal highs.. send to a cuntry that don't make shit anymore....

    try and professional plant with manufacturing standards...like Tami flue...legal highs in Albany with the stargate trust...light years ahead,,,giggle next door...

    lets talk melk powder now.....

    NZ • Since May 2011 • 125 posts Report Reply

  • Graeme Edgeler, in reply to BenWilson,

    If this was not against the law, they’d be out of jail sooner. The amount of time spent in jail for cannabis is a real thing, real people’s lives rotting in jail over something millions of NZers have done regularly.

    No. I'm saying that, for example someone gets two years imprisonment for burglary and one month for possession of class A, for a total sentence of two years and release after one year (because that's how concurrent sentences work). If class A drugs hadn't been found on them, the total sentence would be two years, with release after one year.

    Wellington, New Zealand • Since Nov 2006 • 3215 posts Report Reply

  • Idiot Savant, in reply to Andre,

    The products they are retailing may be slightly different to those originally approved under the regime but there is no testing of the prodyucts so this is covered up.

    Which sounds like a fundamental failure of the regulatory regime. What has Ministry of Health been doing for the last year? Looking at pictures of cats?

    Palmerston North • Since Nov 2006 • 1716 posts Report Reply

  • Shulgin,

    Stewart Lee - Scooby Doo Thatcher Routine (Carpet Remnant World 2012)

    NZ • Since May 2011 • 125 posts Report Reply

  • Shulgin,

    NZ • Since May 2011 • 125 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Graeme Edgeler,

    OK, I get it. So you’re saying it could be that possession plays no part whatsoever in the time that people get, despite there being a conviction for it that does actually carry jail time. Or at the least that the amount of time it contributes is unknown?

    ETA: Leaving aside the question of whether the search for the drugs was a major contributing factor in the other conviction actually happening. If the Misuse of Drugs Act can be invoked at the whiff of cannabis, then finding the received stolen property is a lot easier. But it was stolen property.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10657 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Idiot Savant,

    Which sounds like a fundamental failure of the regulatory regime. What has Ministry of Health been doing for the last year? Looking at pictures of cats?

    It certainly sounds that way. The Act provides for certified analyses, audits and site inspections. But I'm told purity testing for active ingredients has only just been implemented.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia, in reply to Russell Brown,

    It certainly sounds that way. The Act provides for certified analyses, audits and site inspections. But I’m told purity testing for active ingredients has only just been implemented.

    Serious question: What would it take to set up a regime for "purity testing for active ingredients." Someone who knows please correct me if I'm way off base, but I got the impression that wasn't just something you can order off Amazon, or simply port in from overseas.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12370 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Craig Ranapia,

    Yes, I'd give them some slack that it's probably quite a difficult thing to do. They could surely have got a partial result going, though - target the biggest sellers, look at their purity first, because they have the greatest chance to do harm. Then others that have any reliable connection to reported harms actually occurring. That does require some kind of reporting procedure though, which I've never heard of actually happening in A&Es. Whatever supplies the patients had could at the very least have been analyzed. Christ, at the very least of all they could have been kept. We're not talking about hundreds of thousands of incidents. Data would have begun to flow about the honesty of the suppliers and the danger of the actual substances. We're currently in a moral panic about "synthetic cannabis", when we're talking about hundreds of different substances in reality, many of which aren't synthetic cannabis at all.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10657 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Craig Ranapia,

    Serious question: What would it take to set up a regime for “purity testing for active ingredients.” Someone who knows please correct me if I’m way off base, but I got the impression that wasn’t just something you can order off Amazon, or simply port in from overseas.

    No, but the MoH had a long run-up to the passing of the law (which became active immediately on assent) and eight months since. The whole point of this law was that it would be clear what people were consuming.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Russell Brown,

    Just a thought here, too. The MoH may not have considered it a particularly high priority. They're also in the business of harm assessment, and emergency services very much so. While it might be something that they'd note, a rise in this kind of problem, how does it really stack up against the constant flow of people they have to treat? So far, no one has died, nor does it sound like there's even been any kind of ongoing treatment. Most night in A&Es they're treating people who actually have suffered serious and obvious harms - broken bones, head injuries, poisonings, serious bouts of infectious illness, massive lacerations, burst eardrums, injuries sustained in drunken brawls, car crashes and so on. Did up to 4 cases nationwide per week, involving lying the patient down and monitoring them for a few hours, even show up on the serious harm radar?

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10657 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to BenWilson,

    Then others that have any reliable connection to reported harms actually occurring. That does require some kind of reporting procedure though, which I’ve never heard of actually happening in A&Es.

    My impression is that the adverse response reporting part is actually happening adequately. Other forms of monitoring, not so much.

    Last night’s Campbell Live is really worth watching.

    It’s pretty clear to me now that there’s a class of people – young, disenfranchised, mostly brown – in trouble with these substances, but it’s not a problem that started eight months ago. The dramatic reduction in the number of retail outlets has just made visible a problem that developed over the last five years while we were randomly banning things.

    Pulling the plug now isn’t helping that problem. A couple of the users interviewed by Campbell said there was already a black market – people selling things outside shops – and it seems that’s about to take off. I think there needs to be a very serious focus on support services now.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

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