Field Theory by Hadyn Green

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Field Theory: Who says chivalry is dead?

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  • Rich of Observationz,

    v

    though [riders whizzing in their Lycra] is very
    rarely televised

    Possibly due to the fact that depiction of urophilia is specifically illegal in New Zealand.

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    Urophilia ain't the same thing as peeing. Don't tell me it's illegal to show peeing.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • Richard Irvine,

    Re: sportsmanship, you can use it to your advantage - for instance, I always felt Gilchrist's public stance that he'd walk if he felt he was out was a complicated series of mindgames. It didn't stop him appealing for catches or LBWs he clearly knew weren't out in the field, nor did it guarentee he'd walk - "I wasn't sure I hit it, so I stayed where I was," etc.

    If Contador wants to win like that, whatever, that's great for him, but I don't have to like or respect him for it. It's just disappointing for me that the outcome of the race (which is realistically down to a AC v AS showdown) will always have this question mark over it. It was shaping up quite nicely.

    Auckland • Since Dec 2006 • 242 posts Report Reply

  • Graeme Edgeler,

    Possibly due to the fact that depiction of urophilia is specifically illegal in New Zealand.

    The films, videos and publications classification act doesn't apply to television. Which isn't to say there wouldn't be a broadcasting standards breach, but you can't go so far as to say the depiction is specifically illegal on New Zealand television.

    Wellington, New Zealand • Since Nov 2006 • 3212 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    The image of Jerry Collins giving it a last couple of shakes before kick-off is, regrettably, burned into my mind.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • Hadyn Green,

    So is Paula Radcliffe taking a pit stop in the middle of two different marathons.

    EDIT: this was regarding urination during sports on TV. It seemed a little out of context up here.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2090 posts Report Reply

  • Jake Pollock,

    It didn't stop him appealing for catches or LBWs he clearly knew weren't out in the field, nor did it guarentee he'd walk - "I wasn't sure I hit it, so I stayed where I was," etc.

    More to the point, he made sure everyone knew he did it, so he could stand there behind the stumps righteously asking batsmen 'why didn't ya walk? You know you were out' for hours and hours. Real gamesmanship.

    Raumati South • Since Nov 2006 • 489 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    More to the point, it meant he could stand there behind the stumps righteously asking batsmen 'why didn't ya walk? You know you were out' for hours and hours. Real gamesmanship.

    And potentially walk when he knew it wouldn't matter (game was already in the bag or impossible to win), and not do it when he felt it mattered. Whether or not he did that...

    I always liked batsmen who walked, in much the same way that I liked bowlers or fielders who admitted that it wasn't out or called a batsman back. I feel that it might be winning, but if you're being dishonest or withholding information it's the same as cheating.

    It also gives them some standing when they shake their head to the umpire or make some indication that they're not out, or appeal for a dismissal. "Yes I think this is out" is a much stronger statement to be making to an umpire than "go on, will you give me this one as out?"

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Jeremy Andrew,

    Is no one going to mention underarm bowling then?

    Hamiltron - City of the F… • Since Nov 2006 • 900 posts Report Reply

  • Graeme Edgeler,

    Is no one going to mention underarm bowling then?

    I was hoping not, but you ruined it...

    Wellington, New Zealand • Since Nov 2006 • 3212 posts Report Reply

  • Hadyn Green,

    Is no one going to mention underarm bowling then?

    Barry Bonds was slowed considerably when going for his (TAINTEDBYCHEATING) home run record, by pitchers simply not pitching to him. Other great hitters, like Albert (it's pronounced poo-holes) Pujols, find the same thing. A walk isn't as bad as a HR against you.

    But the truly great sportsmen fight you all the way. There was one pitcher (who I think was from the Cardinals) who never tried to walk Bonds and always challenged him to hit the ball. If they are the champ then make them play like it.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2090 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    (it's pronounced poo-holes)

    Nope. Try poo-hols, although I see how it would spoil the slur.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • FletcherB,

    I thought it was pronounced Al-bert ?

    West Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 893 posts Report Reply

  • Richard Irvine,

    Here's what happend when Armstrong crashed in the 2003 tour. Worked out OK for him!

    Auckland • Since Dec 2006 • 242 posts Report Reply

  • Dylan Mordaunt,

    As regards blood doping, asides from the whole 'cheating' perspective, there have been allegations since the 70's that the deaths of many international athletes, particularly cyclists, can be attributed to either autologous transfusions or synthetic erythropoeitin (EPO).

    Between 1987, when EPO became available in Europe, and 1990, 18 Dutch and Belgian cyclists died suddenly, many unofficially (as far as I can tell) attributed to blood doping. It may be that with more modern autopsy techniques that we find that many of these deaths were for other reasons, particularly since high-level athletes are a risk for sudden unexplained death.

    The belief is that these techniques increase the risk of clotting (thrombosis). There is good rationale for caution, and there is some evidence to suggest increased clotting in athletes whom have blood-doped.

    However, the rules do not just restrict blood-doping per se, as the formal limit of haematocrit (the proportion of whole blood which is occupied by red blood cells) of 50% in men and 47% in women effectively restricts the 'too-aggressive' use of any of the 'EPO-stimulating' techniques such as altitude training, hypoxic machines ('hypoxicators'), and altitude tents. WADA also banned the use of any intravenous transfusion in 2006, and considered specifically banning altitude tents.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2007 • 22 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    I stand corrected - I thought the suspect in those deaths was EPO and not the athletes' own blood.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • Sue,

    So there you go Jann Ulrich & Armstrong in the same tour waited.


    I don't think Contador listens to many people, he didn't last year when Armstrong was in the team, but then i suspect having Armstrong come into your team would piss anyone off.

    but really one post about cycling and we go straight to the subject of various types of blood cheating & doping :/

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 527 posts Report Reply

  • Dylan Mordaunt,

    Giovanni, I'm not sure either- I think the terms are sometimes used interchangeably in the press, and I can't find anything which says their deaths were definitively attributed to anything- perhaps the local privacy laws prohibit this?

    Auckland • Since Nov 2007 • 22 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    I looked up a couple of Italian sites and there's no mention of auto-transfusions being dangerous. EPO is supposed to be quite dangerous for the reasons you highlighted.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • Dave Patrick,

    Contador has gear problems (knackered wheel) on the cobblestones and Schleck builds a 30-second lead on that leg. No one complains.

    Shleck knackers his own chain pushing too hard and Contador gets back the 30 seconds he lost. Everyone complains.

    Clear now?

    Rangiora, Te Wai Pounamu • Since Nov 2006 • 261 posts Report Reply

  • Gareth Davidson,

    However it was that same "loser" (AS) who went in to a TV interview with AC (who apologised for what he'd done) and told the crowd to shut up and stop booing Contador.

    Define: kiss and make up.

    Sydney • Since Mar 2007 • 59 posts Report Reply

  • 81stcolumn,

    I looked up a couple of Italian sites and there's no mention of auto-transfusions being dangerous.

    I spoke to some colleagues about this and the following points were made.

    There are basic risks to be associated with any form of blood transfusion, even under medical supervision. As the 1991 PDM affair illustrated, the employment of intravenous techniques is not without significant risk regardless of whether the materials induced are legal or otherwise. It seems entirely feasible that there have been a number of individual instances of things like this going wrong which have gone unreported for obvious reasons.

    Recently, access to “smart centrifuges” has got easier and attention has returned to homologous transfusions as a means of increasing the volume of metabolites available in the bloodstream during post performance recovery. This process if pursued to the extreme would lead a net blood thickening and consequent risk of associated health problems.

    Speaking personally, I might accept that this is a reasonable risk for professional sports people. The difficulty clearly arises where individuals have fewer resources and attempt the same thing. By this I’m referring specifically to amateurs or neo professionals trying to dope with cheaper equipment and little or no supervision. In this context it seems to me that allowing professionals to engage in this behaviour provides endorsement and expectation that will do nothing to discourage this behaviour elsewhere in sport. There is every reason to suspect that doping takes place amongst amateur ranks in Ironman Triathlon for example, which would parallel the growth in recreational steroid use in gyms throughout the world. Natural or not, there is clearly a risk management issue to address here.

    Nawthshaw • Since Nov 2006 • 790 posts Report Reply

  • Martin Lindberg,

    Why dope your body when you can dope your bike?

    Stockholm • Since Jul 2009 • 802 posts Report Reply

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