Field Theory by Hadyn Green

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Field Theory: LOLWTFBBQ

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  • Just thinking,

    If anyone is having trouble finding a replacement cap for your 1/2G - see your chemist. Heaps of bottle tops of all sizes & they're normally happy to help with those personal problems.

    Putaringamotu • Since Apr 2009 • 1158 posts Report Reply

  • Megan Wegan,

    Over Christmas I was told not to bother trying to find a nice beer and just buy Monteiths, it'll be the same. So let me clear that up now. No it's not.

    And I was mocked for refusing to drink Steinlager.

    Welly • Since Jul 2008 • 1275 posts Report Reply

  • Raymond A Francis,

    Sometimes a beer is just a beer,
    ie something cool and wet, to quench a thirst
    Not sure where the PM fits in here though or the Prince

    45' South • Since Nov 2006 • 578 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    And I was mocked for refusing to drink Steinlager.

    Try drinking Mac's Great White. 'What arrr' ya?' Belgian Witbier is not what the 'Real Kiwi Bloke' drinks, apparently. But then again I could always order a Hoegarden.

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • Just thinking,

    That's not any BBQ I've ever been too. Why cook slabs of meat instead of cutting to single serve size for the convienence of your guests.
    BBQ etiquette seems to have been breached by the guest cooking the BBQ. This is strictly the role and responsibility of the host.

    Putaringamotu • Since Apr 2009 • 1158 posts Report Reply

  • Angus Robertson,

    No, that's wrong, there's another big set of beer ads with that trope in it: the drink driving ones.

    And the Tui Blond ads where hype, hype, hype is followed by the bottle with a voiceover "its just a beer launch" - portay beer as beer, not beer as thought.

    Auckland • Since May 2007 • 984 posts Report Reply

  • Naly D,

    Did you know that Skoal is a chewing tobacco brand in the US?

    And there's a beer called Skol?

    Wellington • Since Sep 2008 • 307 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz,

    The thing that gets me is the "West Coast Lager" thing.

    When they redesigned the bottles they should have bit the bullet and changed it to:
    Brewed in Auckland.
    Owned by Singaporeans.
    Get over it.

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz,

    Also, Steinlager describe their product as "the best beer in the world".

    Do the Kirin multinational brewing business (who make Steinlager) accept that all their other products are inferior, and do they rank them in order? Waikato Draught, the 1513rd best beer in the world

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • stephen clover,

    That's not any BBQ I've ever been too. Why cook slabs of meat instead of cutting to single serve size for the convenience of your guests.

    For some reason I was annoyed by the caption which said something about "steaks on the barbie". That's not "steaks on the barbie", that's about $300 of premium eye fillets "on the barbie".

    Yum.

    (Presumably the fillets were oven-roasted in foil, bbqd to char/braise, and then sliced into manageable pieces for guests. I have actually been to BBQs where eye fillet is cooked, but yeah.. it doesn't happen often.)

    wgtn • Since Sep 2007 • 355 posts Report Reply

  • stephen clover,

    Try drinking Mac's Great White. 'What arrr' ya?' Belgian Witbier is not what the 'Real Kiwi Bloke' drinks, apparently.

    'Real Kiwi Blokes' get told to "get fucked" in our house.

    wgtn • Since Sep 2007 • 355 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    'Real Kiwi Blokes' get told to "get f*&#@" in our house.

    Sorry about the edit. I'm a bit sensitive. Yeah well ditto, mostly, but there was those builders working on the house for a bit who insisted on having Heineken, or Hagan, or some other green glassed faux Dutch sounding, but Khyber Pass brewed, beer.

    Hang on, what was it someone said about builders? Mind you, if I had to pick between my builder mates or an ex-banker and a right regal royal, give me the builders any day.

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • Rachel Prosser,

    That's not any BBQ I've ever been too. Why cook slabs of meat instead of cutting to single serve size for the convienence of your guests.

    First time I encountered that was my first night in the USA, hosted by friends of my parents in Riverside California.

    They cooked a big slab of meat, and then cut it up and it was delicious!

    Particularly after living in the UK for 15 months where my desire to eat beef vanished for some reason (I never bought the tasteless offerings from my local supermarket - indoor not outdoor reared I think)

    I think you probably get more tender, jucier, tastier meat cooking it whole and then slicing after resting, rather than cutting it into bits - easier to get medium rare rather the well done. Of course, if you prefer it burnt....

    Christchurch • Since Mar 2008 • 228 posts Report Reply

  • Alastair Jamieson,

    I'll be the first one to have a celebratory beer when NZ becomes a republic, but in the meantime that photo was all wrong.

    If the PM's going to entertain royalty, at least he should do it properly, and getting the guest to cook the fillet steak isn't properly. Nor is drinking crap beer. They should have served something decent like Emerson's organic pilsner, 5000 litres of which (in other news) have just gone tragically to waste...

    Auckland • Since Jan 2007 • 99 posts Report Reply

  • Just thinking,

    Coming back from parts unfamiliar I popped into Liquourland to swap-a-crate.

    This Liquorland wouldn't do it. No worries on to the one closer to SuperL closer to home.

    Who was thinking of the children, and our environmental impact?

    Putaringamotu • Since Apr 2009 • 1158 posts Report Reply

  • Hamish Fraser,

    The 'Good Bloke' only really exists now in commercials because of the beer the rest of us are drinking :-)

    http://www.gruitale.com/art_fall_of_gruit.htm

    Since Nov 2006 • 5 posts Report Reply

  • B Jones,

    I've just read Feast: Why Humans Share Food and it has some lovely stuff about big showy displays of public food ("exocuisine") and private family food stewed up in pots ("endocuisine"). It puts the big slab of meat at the barbecue into a new light (apparently our distant ancestors would have traded food for sex right on site), and perhaps even sheds light on the bugger who brings sizzlers but eats three salmon kebabs.

    Anyway, I think barbecue chef title goes to the top ranking male rather than the host, in this context.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 976 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Mac's Light - a really good real beer (and 1.5% alcohol.)

    Collops (thick -venison in my whanau's case- roundels) are GREAT on a barbeque - especially if they've been marinated aforehand.

    B. Jones - "Feast" is an excellent book.

    Alaistair J - will be drinking right along with you (your lefty non-royal small p -atron raises - uurrrm - a Waipara Hills 2008 pinot gris to that happening, quite soon--)

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Robyn Gallagher,

    We use scull, as in rowing, possibly due to the connections to sport and drinking culture.

    WTF? There's no etymological connection between scull (drinking) and scull (rowing). The rowing term comes from the Middle English word sculle and ain't got nothing to do with the drinking word.

    But it is possible that the spelling of the rowing term has influenced the spelling of the drinking term when it finally came time to write it down. I mean, it would be a bit morbid to skull a drink. Unless you were a pirate.

    Incidentally, while skol is a common toast around the world, to scull a beverage is a unique Australasian term.

    Cheers!

    Raglan • Since Nov 2006 • 1946 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    E. Partridge, "Origins"-
    "scull= oar........sense-development shallow wickerbasket....ON skjola
    a bucket-"



    -hmmm. Yes.

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • linger,

    Yep, and there you have your semantic connection:
    bucket= (large) cup.
    The word sculle may have first been used in Middle English within the history of English, but that's no guarantee it wasn't borrowed or repurposed from elsewhere at that time.
    Looking back and saying "there's no connection" is a bit like looking at current English uses of cup and saying "but there's no connection between 'an object used to drink out of' and 'an object used to hold breasts in place'." :-)
    (In this case, the two uses are the same word etymologically -- but the connection with drinking played no part in this particular sense development.)

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1942 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    I *so* love language!

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • linger,

    ...though similarly, the etymological connection between the uses of cup as 'a sporting trophy' and 'a protective item of cricket gear' is not their common relationship to sport.
    Such a claim would completely justify Robyn's "WTF?" reaction above.

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1942 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Non-sequitur-

    the origin of 'cup' is a rounded cavity (as you v. well know.)

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • linger,

    That was kind of my point (I'm just not good at getting to it).

    We have to be careful to distinguish between "original meaning", and "usual meaning" at a given time , though.
    [e.g. what is recorded in surviving Old Norse or Old English texts = evidence for the usual meaning(s) at that time, not for any single "original meaning"!]

    Today, "an object used for drinking out of" is the prototypical current definition of cup: it's what anyone will immediately say if asked to define the word -- even if it's not the historical centre of meaning developments for the word; the meanings instead are mostly based around the 'rounded cavity' shape.

    We know skoal meant 'cup' on most occasions of use at the time it was borrowed into Old English. But we don't and can't know the ultimate origin and function(s) of skoal (yes, we have some early attested uses, but that's not ever going to be a reliable enough sample to establish the full functional range). However, as its attested meaning overlaps considerably with that of English cup, it's likely to have been susceptible to the same kinds of meaning shift, which just happen to include the same kind of connection that was being held up by Robyn as being unlikely.

    As native speakers, we don't have enough evidence to judge whether meanings were ever etymologically related. Fortunately, the question usually doesn't matter to us as users of the language.

    Staying in the same semantic field, consider mug: 'an object used to drink out of'; 'a person's head or face'; 'a foolish person'; 'the act of attacking someone, usually for personal gain'.

    It is likely that most native speakers of modern English do not actually connect any of these uses, regardless of whether there are any historical relationships.

    Nevertheless, the first three uses, at least, represent meaning developments that are actually very common: connections between words signifying "(empty) vessel", "head" and "stupid person" are attested in many languages, and arise through a fairly obvious "head=empty" metaphor. (And the fourth meaning listed is also related, as an example of "making someone look weak and foolish".)

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1942 posts Report Reply

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