Hard News by Russell Brown

Read Post

Hard News: Wellington, you win

99 Responses

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 4 Newer→ Last

  • Don Christie,

    My theory about Wellington's grimness myth, evolved out of the rail ferry terminal. It's under the motor way, it's gray and if there's a southerly its cold and windy.

    I once saw one a theatrical event based on Fiat Bambinos at that venue. In many ways that was a turning point time for Wellington.

    It gets quite nasty at times.

    I'm sure. But the chip on the shoulder stuff about Wellington and our noses being placed firmly in the taxpayers trough can get rather tiresome as well. It does seem to cut both ways.

    All that being said, to the Webstock organisers, congratulations. I failed again to attend or support but I have been along to a few of the mini-Webstocks and can vouch for those as being great as well.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 1645 posts Report Reply

  • Don Christie,

    By the way, in all this appreciation of things Wellington we should not forget Russell's huge influence on...things. The KGB evenings, foo camp, Webstock and many other events have all the hallmarks of, at the very least, his influence and more often his clod hoppers.

    Thanks Russell for being a catalyst and Auckland for hosting him.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 1645 posts Report Reply

  • Don Christie,

    And seeing as how I'm on a roll here (talking to myself), the changes in Wellington people comment on are a microcosm of changes across NZ. Quite frankly, in the last 15 years the whole country has become a better, more interesting place in which to live.

    I have similar feelings about Auckland improvements that others point to WRT Wellington.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 1645 posts Report Reply

  • Simon Grigg,

    But the chip on the shoulder stuff about Wellington and our noses being placed firmly in the taxpayers trough can get rather tiresome as well.

    maybe its the circles I move in, but really I've not heard that for years, and even then only once or twice. I'd say most people in Auckland regard the capital as a fairly pleasant, sophisticated place to visit, with good food and coffee. And we are rather happy that the capital is down there...god forbid anyone ever considers moving it.

    And coming out of the gorge and seeing the harbour is one of my favourite vistas in NZ. I love the road into Wellington.

    To be honest, the only folk I ever hear being nasty about the place are ex-Welingtonians moved north. Not sure what that means.

    Just another klong... • Since Nov 2006 • 3283 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    To be honest, the only folk I ever hear being nasty about the place are ex-Welingtonians moved north. Not sure what that means.

    Probable something to do with the weather.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4411 posts Report Reply

  • Che Tibby,

    Thanks Russell for being a catalyst and Auckland for hosting him.

    hear hear. russell has organised some of the best events i've been to over the past few years in wellington. the great blend being an example.

    and mr crawford is right, wellington's public transport has added to our dreary image. on my first trip here the airport terminal was in fact, and indisputably, a shed. courtney place was a windy bus terminal full of old soaks sleeping off their hangovers (and then starting again), and all public servants dressed in grey.

    fortunately black is the new grey.

    the rest has changed markedly.

    excepting the ferry terminal, which might as well be designed for herding sheep into a abattoir.

    oh, and when rb isn't here we just have to make our own fun. which helps you know, it tends to keep the dozens of bars, restaurants and cafes open while russell is getting his next event together.

    the back of an envelope • Since Nov 2006 • 2042 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    And seeing as how I'm on a roll here (talking to myself), the changes in Wellington people comment on are a microcosm of changes across NZ. Quite frankly, in the last 15 years the whole country has become a better, more interesting place in which to live.

    ... I agree..We went out last night to a screening of F.W. Murnau's silent masterpiece 'Sunrise' (1927), part of Hamilton's Summer Garden Festival. It was extraordinary enjoyable, watching the film on a screen positioned in the Chinese pavilion, under a full moon and with much laughter from a sizeable crowd. I felt privileged to be living in any part of NZ.

    Other screenings this week include The Locals (with director Greg Page in attendance), Gloomy Sunday and Rocky Horror.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2557 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    We went out last night to a screening of F.W. Murnau's silent masterpiece 'Sunrise' (1927)

    Oh, I love that film! Yay for Hamilton.

    And also, yay for the Auckland zoo, kazoo solos, bopping around to 'Bright Grey', and note-perfectly badass covers of 'Love is the Drug'. Lumber up, limbo down.

    (I assume any news of Finn will be posted here? Hope so.)

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Richard Llewellyn,

    And also, yay for the Auckland zoo, kazoo solos, bopping around to 'Bright Grey', and note-perfectly badass covers of 'Love is the Drug'. Lumber up, limbo down.

    Ditto. A perfect end to a great weekend, starting with an early viewing of There Will Be Blood (and there was, and DDL was positively barking - well masticated scenery dripping from his mouth) and finishing with The PF at the Zoo ..... as Mark says, dancing like a loon with the kids. Hope Finn returns.

    Mt Albert • Since Nov 2006 • 399 posts Report Reply

  • Mark Easterbrook,

    ..... as Mark says, dancing like a loon with the kids

    Actually that should be "dancing like a loon with kid AND giraffe and Lion King soft toys."

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 262 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    There Will Be Blood

    Man, everyone loves this film. I am so wary, because my hatred for Magnolia knew no bounds. Just the thought of that film makes me viscerally angry. Gack.

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Richard Llewellyn,

    I am so wary, because my hatred for Magnolia knew no bounds

    Well ...... while its fair to say There Will Be Blood is very different to Magnolia, there are a few similar themes.

    Myself, I think TWBB is a landmark film that will still be causing arguments in 50 years time, whereas Magnolia - for all that I personally enjoyed it - struck me as pre-packaged forgettable Robert Altman-lite.

    Mt Albert • Since Nov 2006 • 399 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    Well ...... while its fair to say There Will Be Blood is very different to Magnolia, there are a few similar themes.

    Are the characters one-dimensional set-pieces who keep repeating, heavy-handedly, what they symbolise in the film? Is the music weirdly portentous when nothing interesting is happening? Does everyone chew the scenery like a maniac? Are the camera zooms distracting and annoying? Are the themes so obvious that you feel like PT Anderson is thumping you over the head with a Big! Wooden! Meaningful! Mallet! of Importance! Is it leaden and humourless? Because... yeah.

    You see, Richard, I'm not sure if you've gathered, but I really, really, really hated Magnolia. :)

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Richard Llewellyn,

    Heh - I think I'm with you now Danielle :) - after the Magnolia experience, did you bother subjecting yourself to Punch Drunk Love?

    Mt Albert • Since Nov 2006 • 399 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    You see, Richard, I'm not sure if you've gathered, but I really, really, really hated Magnolia. :)

    I always feel affirmed when someone says that. Because so many people rave about how bloody brilliant it is, and I stopped watching it because I couldn't be arsed carrying on.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    Me three. I always get a wee bit suspicious when the critics rave, and then several of my more faddy friends rave, about a film. Plus which any film that Tom Cruise is in, no matter how good the rest of the cast is, is not one that I want to see.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3136 posts Report Reply

  • Julie Fairey,

    I really enjoyed up to a point. That would be the point at which it got incredibly silly and just made me feel stupid for not getting it. Not a big fan of filums that make me feel dumb. *grump*

    Puketapapa Mt Roskill, AK… • Since Dec 2007 • 234 posts Report Reply

  • Julie Fairey,

    Eeek, that should say:

    I really enjoyed Magnolia up to a point.

    And to further underline my argument - raining frogs? puhlease.

    Puketapapa Mt Roskill, AK… • Since Dec 2007 • 234 posts Report Reply

  • Richard Llewellyn,

    I always feel affirmed when someone says that. Because so many people rave about how bloody brilliant it is, and I stopped watching it because I couldn't be arsed carrying on

    Heh - well, on the Magnolia front I'm obviously somewhere between the fad-boys and Danielle - I enjoyed it as an entertaining sub-Altman ensemble piece, thought he had done better movies, and promptly forgot all about it. Just couldn't muster enough oomph to get mightily enthused or outraged.

    But I digress, as much as TWBB is more deserving of a violent reaction, the real highlight of the weekend was the Phoenix Foundation and friends at the zoo. Love those zoo concerts.

    Mt Albert • Since Nov 2006 • 399 posts Report Reply

  • andrew llewellyn,

    Since Nov 2006 • 2075 posts Report Reply

  • Gareth Ward,

    on my first trip here the airport terminal was in fact, and indisputably, a shed.

    Thankfully that shed is now... umm... pumpkins?
    Which I must admit I like in some ways, seemingly in the minority on that though

    Auckland, NZ • Since Mar 2007 • 1727 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson,

    I actually enjoyed Tom Cruise in Magnolia. I'm not entirely sure if he realized he was parodying himself, but no-one else could have done a better job of it. Playing a cheezy cult-leader arsehole... Hollywood does seem to cast method actors a lot.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10650 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    Heh - I think I'm with you now Danielle :) - after the Magnolia experience, did you bother subjecting yourself to Punch Drunk Love?

    I forgot to say: there are three members of my Very Tiny PT Anderson Hate Club* - my husband, my friend Ben, and me. Ben *did* subject himself to Punch Drunk Love, and reported to me that although it was not as horrifyingly bad as Magnolia, it did also suck, for similarly hateable reasons. I had faith in him and stayed well clear.

    Although there are plenty of perfectly respectable film-loving people who like Magnolia, I am very happy that Russell doesn't like it either! I feel not only affirmed, but validated. Like parking.

    *subtitle: 'With The Exception Of Boogie Nights, Which Is A Pretty Good Scorsese Homage'.

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Hey Lmao,

    Manukau is not a city. The centre contains a Westfield, public offices, substantial police and justice facilities (supply and demand), two pubs, two cafes, a Warehouse, a smaller shopping mall and various factories, call centres and lunch bars sprawling into the distance. Plus a theme park.

    That is a suburb which happens to have had local government concentrated there.

    Ditto Takapuna "North Shore City", Henderson "Waitakere City", etc.

    Actually Manukau is a city. Covers over 55,000 hectares and with a population of 335,000 is the 3rd largest city in NZ. This "suburb" as you refer to it, is the Manukau CBD.

    Ditto North Shore, and Waitakere etc

    Since Mar 2009 • 1 posts Report Reply

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 4 Newer→ Last

Post your response…

Please sign in using your Public Address credentials…

Login

You may also create an account or retrieve your password.