Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: Truck Off, etc

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  • Phil Palmer,

    What they should have done is come out batting, and tackle the issue head on, and talk about cost of living, talk about petrol, talk about what the truckers want and what the Government is doing

    Er, I thought that's what Annette King did on Close Up. I don't like her much but I was quite impressed.

    Since Nov 2006 • 36 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    A little bit of history. Tranz Rail in 1997

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia,

    A little bit of history. Tranz Rail in 1997

    Point in there?

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12370 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Another installment in the series of ludicrous press releases from attention-seeking fringe-dwellers. This time: The Libertarianz:

    **"Bring on the Gridlock!" Says Libertarianz Leader

    Thursday, 3 July 2008, 2:17 pm
    Press Release: Libertarianz Party
    PRESS RELEASE

    FOR IMMEDIATE
    TRANSPORT**

    "Bring on the Gridlock!" Says Libertarianz Leader

    Libertarian leader Bernard Darnton applauds New Zealand's truckers, who are leading the way in saying to this busybody government: "Naff off!"

    "The limits to government bullying are generally measured by the apathy of the populace," says Darnton. "New Zealanders have been pushed around and trodden upon by scum, but most have responded only by quiet moaning over the dinner table -- New Zealanders' apathy, however, has only made the bullies more grasping, not less."

    "For once, tomorrow, the apathy is over. The anger of New Zealanders at all the thieving and the nannying and all their venal power lust will be directed at government through thousands of truckies in cities across the country protesting the overnight raid on their wallets by Annette King -- protesting against a government, and a minister, that has proved better at doing us over than it has at protecting us, and has now taken the opportunity to prove it by putting the boot into an industry which is already on the canvas from rising fuel prices.

    "The chaos caused by truckers tomorrow morning is a barb directed at big government on behalf of all of us," concludes Darnton. "Let's get in behind them."

    "It's enough to make you vote LIbertarianz!"

    Because, clearly, the Libz think think road transport should be subsidised with your taxes and that the nanny state should always shelter businesses from external economic realities such as high fuel prices.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    Point in there?

    Yes. 'Though it's hard to see through Blue tinted glasses.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia,

    Yes. 'Though it's hard to see through Blue tinted glasses.

    Well, Steve, please come back and argue that there were no workplace accidents in the rail industry before the eevil privatization, and I'll put my partner (who has been in that industry for forty three years) who will attempt to quantify just how much crap you're carrying.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12370 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz,

    Exactly Russell.

    I assume from their general ideology that propertarians would introduce a privatized road system. A rational road company would have numerous reasons to charge heavy trucks as much as possible. Firstly, having an unregulated monopoly, they would only be restrained by competition from rail or sea freight. Secondly, they would be keen, as the airline industry does, to charge non-discretionary customers (trucks) more in order to subsidize discretionary customers (leisure motorists).

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5429 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    For once I kind of agree with Michael Laws.

    I remember saying that about ten years ago (it may have been longer, it wasn't that memorable) he has a keen mind but acts like a boy racer when he opens his mouth and puts his foot down with a firm hand. Doncha just love a mixed metaphor?
    Let's not judge people for their mistakes, if we are to judge at all it should;d be for their deliberate actions, like asset stripping or some thing.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    A bit more history for you Craig about the Unacceptable Face of Capitalism

    Rowland's career personifies that of capital the world over. His methods are standard practice today, and no contemporary politician would bat an eyelid. In so far as he was then the "unacceptable face" of capitalism, it was because Rowland did not take the customary care to don the disguise of aristocratic "concern" and "responsibility" perfected over decades by the British ruling class. That mask has long since been discarded, as Thatcher and her successors celebrated the ruthlessness and selfishness of corporate money-grubbing.

    You could substitute the African references with New Zealand rail and Papakura water if you wish.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    And, while we are talking about Africa and Russians and looms and ......................

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • samuel walker,

    Ah, it was fantastic, it was like a glossy bitch. It was so bright, it was a metallic wonder. Small boys would rather eat a pair of scissors than go near the glossy bitch. "Don't make me go near it, I'll eat another pair of scissors. I can't look at it, it's doin' me pupils in!" Ah, it was fantastic, it was very warlike, the body was very warlike. But the eyes? They were telling a different story. Hardly warlike: eyes, like the eyes of an old russian lady, who had seen too much. An old russian lady, with her arm caught in a loom, and big sailors would walk past and go "Hello!" and she'd go "No, not hello. My arm - it's in a loom." And they'd go, "Yes, hello!", and she'd go, "No, not hello. It's gone maroon. My arm, it is in a loom." And they'd go "Yes, hello!", and she'd go "No, not hello -", and in the end she'd have to pick up the two-ton loom, and walk them, follow them home, and knock on their front window, and they'd be going "Oh, you're scaring me a little bit now". That's what the eyes were like: dangerous, but beautiful at the same time.

    Since Nov 2006 • 203 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    It's good innit?

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

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