Up Front by Emma Hart

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Up Front: Where You From?

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  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Russell Brown,

    Hence the Builders’ ‘Clifford Flat’?

    I would imagine so…
    Bill has sourced local businesses for inspiration at times –
    one of his earlier bands was after all Vacuum Blue Ladder
    named a after a cleaning firm in Gloucester Street…

    The song before Clifford Flat on the Builders compilation Pyx vol 4
    is Alligator Song the film clip for which was filmed in the now rubbled lane areas off Manchester st.. The Bats did a great clip in the now sadly demolished ANZ building (World) on Lichfield / High corner… in fact one could probably compile a great DVD of Chch Clips with now destroyed landmarks in them – could be a fundraiser.
    (Many will be pleased to know that the corrugated iron fence and shed in the background of The Tall Dwarfs’ Weeville LP cover are still standing!)

    —————————————————————————————–

    Does anyone know what has happened to the Mysterex blogspot ?
    it seems to have disappeared – which would be a crime against the frailty of human memory – well mine anyway…

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to linger,

    associated with “impetuous youth”

    national character?

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • philipmatthews,

    Does anyone know what has happened to the Mysterex blogspot ?
    it seems to have disappeared – which would be a crime against the frailty of human memory – well mine anyway…

    That was Andrew Schmidt, wasn't it? He has a new popular culture blog -- http://cautionweirdlode.wordpress.com/ -- but I don't know if he has archived Mysterex anywhere. Hope he has: it was a brilliant resource.

    A few weeks ago, on Mysterex, he posted the clip for Suzanne Said by the Shallows, some of which pans around Cathedral Square -- another for the list. Wasn't there a Clean video in the Square too (Anything Can Happen)? Also, Ronnie van Hout directed a clip for Getting Older that looks like it's shot in pre-gentrified (pre-Henderson) brick warehouses, but I could be wrong.

    One of these days I'll write up my notes for a long blog entry on Chch on film -- the lost city. Heavenly Creatures, the Henderson "biopic"/fantasy We're Here to Help, even the 5 minutes of old railway Chch in Goodbye Pork Pie. Are there others?

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2007 • 656 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    Was that the blue house, Geoff, or the one next door?

    Emma: a big, two-storey wooden house and, I think, a very faded blue. There were a great bunch of people living there and it was rather sad when it all fell apart (I set off to do postgrad studies in Ohio). The roof-top water-tank collapsed and water poured over the verandahs and no one did anything about it.

    I recall biking across Hagley Park in the foggy early hours, after washing dishes in a poncy restaurant in Bedford Row.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2560 posts Report Reply

  • Lucy Stewart, in reply to Megan Wegan,

    I'm trying to slow down, I swear!

    No, no, I prefer the New Zealand approach. It doesn't induce impatience.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2105 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand, in reply to philipmatthews,

    Chch on film – the lost city.

    Whilst I was at UoC I was recruited to help with filming GPP in Christchurch. I found the bloke who was willing to take out his teeth and eat an pie, and organise a string quartet to play in the Arts Centre. I think those scenes are still in the film. It all happened because I was a friend of the former wife of Roger Donaldson.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2560 posts Report Reply

  • linger, in reply to Geoff Lealand,

    In the original release; but the Chch exterior scenes (other than in the railway yard) were almost entirely removed from the “director’s cut” DVD.

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1942 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson,

    Auckland, represent. Born North, raised inner West, schooled East, Varsity Centre, first real job South, settled and procreated West. But Melbourne has a big piece of me too, I often miss it. I hate to say it, but I love Australians almost as much as NZers.

    I've never had anything but a good time in other NZ cities. But nor have I ever spent more than 2 weeks in any of them. To say Auckland is 50 Timarus is praising both towns in my opinion.

    I love the geography of this town, it's one of the biggest selling points to me. Being close to both coasts is awesome, Piha is my yardstick for beaches around the whole world, and the Gulf is stunning. Waiheke is a rare gem, not many cities get to have an island that mixes development with unspoiled nature as one of its suburbs. But nearly every suburb is close to some waterway, and not far from a decent beach. Rangitoto always sits there as that strange enigma, a fresh symbol of the earth's violent potential, while the older hills are softer, more integrated with life and humanity, and they provide some of the best views in New Zealand. Again, rare to have dozens of spots were you can rise above the entire city and see clear from the Waitakeres to Coromandel, from Bombay to Whangaparoa.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10657 posts Report Reply

  • philipmatthews, in reply to Geoff Lealand,

    Whilst I was at UoC I was recruited to help with filming GPP in Christchurch. I found the bloke who was willing to take out his teeth and eat an pie, and organise a string quartet to play in the Arts Centre. I think those scenes are still in the film.

    They are. The geezer with the pie was very good casting. (The DVD I watched the other day was a North American release rather than the two-disc NZ one I saw a few years ago; it may be a longer cut?)

    Actually, the most widely seen appearance of Chch on film was probably the Star's bit part in Oliver Stone's JFK conspiracy theory.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2007 • 656 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to ChrisW,

    Glad you made it to your home Chris W. Best of luck with your treatment. Stay strong.
    xox

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Ben Austin,

    North Otago, Dunedin, Wellington now London so far - all have been home but I guess only the first is where I'm from, but then the family has been there since the 1850s.

    Maybe it is a rural thing, but town/country was a pretty important division growing up, so despite my urban self, I still sort of identify with the country as opposed to the town.

    London • Since Nov 2006 • 1027 posts Report Reply

  • 3410,

    I found the bloke who was willing to take out his teeth and eat an pie, and organise a string quartet to play in the Arts Centre.

    That's quite an unlikely talent... ;-)

    Auckland • Since Jan 2007 • 2618 posts Report Reply

  • Jacqui Dunn, in reply to Megan Wegan,

    These days we’re taught it’s OK to sound like a New Zealander, as long as you sound like a New Zealander everyone can understand.

    That’s it exactly. I’m not against a New Zealand accent – for heavens’ sakes, I’ve got one myself!
    @ Sacha: Catriona McLeod is a prime example of someone going for the Modulated Well-pronounced words, without actually understanding and getting across the meaning of what she’s saying. She also stresses odd words, utterly changing meaning on top of that. ETA: Although I have heard her mispronounce....it's more the rounded vowels she's going for.

    Deepest, darkest Avondale… • Since Jul 2010 • 585 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle, in reply to Jacqui Dunn,

    Catriona McLeod

    My mother is slightly obsessed with how she pronounces 'strengthening' during the weather report. 'Where is the g? She's saying STRENTHening! I can't bear it!'

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Jacqui Dunn, in reply to Danielle,

    Ha! Yes. Once you've heard the miss, it's ghastly. Can get a bit obsessive....I follow along after Ms McLeod, re-interpreting for meaning and correcting mispronunciation. The result is, I usually don't have a clue what I've just heard after that!

    Deepest, darkest Avondale… • Since Jul 2010 • 585 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Jacqui Dunn,

    the rounded vowels

    shudder

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    Well, you'd never guess where I am from. And I like it that way.

    Although actually, in spite of having lived in Milan for 27 years, I am not properly home until I visit the village where my grandparents lived, where I spent a fraction of that time. But some of my strongest childhood memories are tied to that place. And still, whenever I fly back into Wellington after one of my regular jaunts back to visit Mum, that's where the phrase "you're home now" rings the strongest. The Miramar waterfront, in a car or a taxi: that is it.

    Lately to many friends and acquaintances overseas I have been from Christchurch, somehow. Although perhaps they are right in their own way. Emily Perkins' post-earthquake line to the effect that we're such a small community resonates with me.

    Seriously lovely post, Emma, by the way.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • 3410,

    Well, you'd never guess where I am from.

    New Jersey?

    Auckland • Since Jan 2007 • 2618 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    Chch on film – the lost city

    not to forget Frighteners for its morphing of Lyttelton into “Anytown, USA”, left hand drive and all…

    I think we featured in a British UK series back in the ’70s – Mogul / Troubleshooters when in one shot they arrived in Auckland, drove thru Wellington into the Lyttelton road tunnel – or similar geographical mash-up. – aaah simpler times….

    Might be worth suggesting that Chch streetscapes with bands video/DVD to Flying Nun – they don’t appear to be doing anything else lately, and this would be a strong hook to hang some nostalgia on…

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • Jacqui Dunn, in reply to BenWilson,

    To say Auckland is 50 Timarus is praising both towns in my opinion.

    I love the geography of this town, it’s one of the biggest selling points to me. Being close to both coasts is awesome, Piha is my yardstick for beaches around the whole world, and the Gulf is stunning. Waiheke is a....

    How can you start like that and then go on like that, Ben? Waxing so lyrical?

    One of the best views was one I used to get on the bus going up Symonds St towards Kingsland. I'd sit in one of the backwards-facing seats on purpose, just to get a glimpse of that view. Trees (the cemetery) down to water, and yachts - dozens of them on a good day - towards distant hills/islands. Magic.

    Deepest, darkest Avondale… • Since Jul 2010 • 585 posts Report Reply

  • George Darroch,

    For me, therea are degrees of homeness. I hope this post doesn't make anyone dizzy.

    There's a large home in Māngere, where I spent the first 19 years of my life, still occupied by my parents. It, and the rest of Auckland still fits me like a warm glove

    Wellington felt like home within a few months of moving there, it had so thoroughly encapsulated me. Interestingly enough, when I return there now I feel entirely like a visitor. There are more distant homelands; Nelson, Otago, the Far North; all places my family has lived. Blueskin Bay is where the namesake ancestor rowed ashore and I spent the summer of '04.

    And most recently, Australia has started to feel like home. Canberra I lived in for three years, wanting to leave the entire time, and then Brisbane and Melbourne, places I chose to set down in.

    Though I'm not there presently, I feel like I'm only visiting. I'd started to feel thoroughly Australian after four years, a prospect that filled other kiwis I talked to with horror. My Nu Zild accent was ways light to begin with as a result of my middle class parentage and living extensively with internationals in NZ and Australia. After two years or so I'd consciously shifted my vowels and injected a little Strayan, people would hardly pick where I was from, frequently thinking the UK. I couldn't understand New Zealand accents, and John Key sounded very strange. After a few weeks back here, I've unjumbled the speech patterns, and theirs and mine are more familiar.

    Unlike Deborah, who would talk about "moments of enculturation" in her children, and how she pined for home, I still felt malleable enough to pick things up and embrace them as mine. Last year I read this thoughtful piece by Simon Grigg, and it resonated. I'd started to feel a little stateless. I'm perhaps less so now, by virtue of being 'home' in Māngere, but it stays with me.

    So now, I'm a New Zealander, who lives in Australia, who is living in New Zealand. I intend to return within the year, for an indefinite period of time. That might change....

    Home for me is ultimately where you have to stand, and where you face. An immutable place, and a referential one.

    WLG • Since Nov 2006 • 2264 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to philipmatthews,

    One of these days I’ll write up my notes for a long blog entry on Chch on film – the lost city. Heavenly Creatures, the Henderson “biopic”/fantasy We’re Here to Help, even the 5 minutes of old railway Chch in Goodbye Pork Pie. Are there others?

    Hey, NZ On Screen has plans to allow geotagging of works on the site. We'd be more than delighted if you were to write up those notes!

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • webweaver,

    As a New-Zealander-who-was-born-somewhere-else (the UK), I have always found it very interesting how often people will ask me “so when was the last time you went home?” or “I heard you’re going home [meaning the UK] for Christmas”. My reply has always begun: “well, home is here – but…”.

    It surprises me when ex-pats still refer to the country of their birth as “home” – even after they’ve lived here for decades. I made a conscious decision to become a Kiwi in every way possible when I emigrated here – there didn’t seem much point otherwise – and so I’ve called NZ “home” for the past 18+ years.

    If I’m asked where I’m from, like most people, it depends on where I’m being asked, and by whom.

    In the UK, the answer to that question is “New Zealand” and then a secondary answer might be “but I was born in the UK”. If it’s a question from a Kiwi in NZ, then I generally say Wellington, and then again I might clarify that by saying I was born in the UK but have lived here for nearly 20 years.

    For almost the entire time I’ve lived here, I’ve always said I would never leave, and that I couldn’t imagine any possible reason why I would ever want to go back to live in the UK.

    And then the ChCh earthquake happened, and suddenly everything was different.

    I was suddenly completely terrified of living here – especially in Welli – and I felt as though at any second we’d get The Big One as well, and I just couldn’t handle the anxiety.

    For the first time since I renounced my Englishness and became a Kiwi I didn’t want to be here. For the first time ever when I called my sister in the UK I said “I want to come home”. And for the first time ever the words “I hate it here and I don’t want to live here any more” passed my lips.

    Well, that was a few weeks ago now.

    Over the past month I have been learning how to be a staunch Kiwi in the face of Mother Nature, and re-assessing my initial panicked response. Plan A (go back and live in the UK) has morphed into Plan B (move up the coast but continue to work in Welli) and then plans C and D (variations on finding somewhere else to live in Welli that’s not on a slope – yeah good luck with that – and not so close to the fault line).

    And I find that what has come out of all of this is a renewed love of my adopted country, a realisation that this really is where I want to stay, and quite a passionate re-appreciation of the wonders of NZ, and of Wellington in particular.

    I look at the houses clinging precariously to slopes and hillsides, splendid in their wooden villa-ness or their modern architectural defiance of gravity, and I think to myself how much I love them, and how much I love this place, and how completely mental we all are to live somewhere where it could all fall down in a matter of seconds.

    I realise how fragile and precious we all are, and how fragile and precious our way of life is, and the fragility and value of our crazy architecture – and I love it all even more than I did before The Day That Everything Changed.

    I still have no idea how those of you who live in ChCh are brave or strong enough to choose to stay – I don’t think my newly learned staunch skills would be up to the task at all – but I have been able to remind myself that there are so many wonderful things about living in NZ, and living in Wellington, that it’s worth the risk to do so.

    Ask me again if Welli gets another shake (hoping as always that it’s only a little one) and I might be a bit wobbly myself again, but I think I might be finally figuring out how to live happily in a country where the earth moves on a regular basis. For me, home is Wellington, New Zealand, and I appreciate and love it every day.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 332 posts Report Reply

  • Jacqui Dunn, in reply to giovanni tiso,

    Well, you’d never guess where I am from. And I like it that way.

    You certainly don't have an accent when you write :), so am I wrong in thinking you don't have an accent when you speak? And that's why we'd never guess?

    Deepest, darkest Avondale… • Since Jul 2010 • 585 posts Report Reply

  • RaggedJoe,

    Great discussion, prompting long time lurker to comment.

    For me, where I am from is quite a different question to where is home.

    I can never answer where I am from without covering parents born and raised in Timaru, me born in Wellington and leaving at 18mnths old for Auckland, primary schooling there interupted by stints in London (3 years) and Sydney (6 mnths), secondary schooling in Auckland, followed by farming in Taranaki, university in Christchurch and settling back in Auckland. If further inquires are forthcoming, 6th generation NZer.

    Where is home? Our current house of nearly 20 years in SE Auckland, built by my in laws and my wife's family home from age 10. Simple.


    For notasgalegic lanscape memories, the view of Mt Egmont (Taranaki now I know, but Egmont then) from out behind the waves at Stent Road as the sun went down, the land went dark and the snow on the mountain changed to pink. Always made me wish I could claim a stonger ancestoral connection to the Naki.

    City of Sales • Since Sep 2008 • 72 posts Report Reply

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