Southerly by David Haywood

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Southerly: England's Pleasant Pastures Seen

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  • David Haywood,

    Moira Goldie wrote:

    I really enjoyed your blog David, but perhaps your awful cold meant your view of things was slightly jaundiced!

    Well, you may have a point. That, and the awful weather, and the near-complete lack of sunlight...

    Jolisa wrote:

    How did you resist the temptation to sit young Roger, I mean Bob, in the bows for a perfect photo op?

    A big sign prohibiting such things, and lots of security cameras.

    But I did meet a lady who'd had tea with the real-life Roger and Bridget. Slightly stunned me, I must admit. Incidentally, I have some photos for BusyBoy, which I'll send ASAP.

    81stcolumn wrote:

    A trip worth making is to go to the Royal Academy and take a look at the Watercolours by Turner and the catch the train up to Snowdonia.

    Now that sounds very much to my taste. If possible, I shall attempt to rise the family from our deathbeds, and take a drive down in that direction.

    Jolisa, Joe Wylie, and Craig Ranapia wrote:

    [Lots of insightful things about children's literature]...

    This makes me sick(er) than ever with nerves about this year's Southerly Christmas Eve story. In my defence, can I say that it's very difficult to provide Benjamin Franzmayr with a glass half-full, and at the same time meet the Gracewood, Ranapia, and Joe 'The Groke' Wylie specifications for a "heart of pragmatic darkness".

    Oh, wake me when it's all over.

    Dunsandel • Since Nov 2006 • 1156 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia,

    A trip worth making is to go to the Royal Academy and take a look at the Watercolours by Turner and the catch the train up to Snowdonia. I am in no way a religious man but the light boiling from behind the clouds captured by Turner and seen for real at Llyn Ogwen on a spring day inspires a sense of godliness and goes some way to explaining the abundance of churches in the area.

    Now, that's one reason to forgive the British any amount of awesomely shitty weather. Turner. And Constable -- someone else who tried to fix the chaos of fire and storm head and rain and empires of foliage and flower in pigment and ash.

    Oh, wake me when it's all over.

    You are so not getting off that easily...

    Kidnap the Sandy Claws, beat him with a stick!
    Lock him up for ninety years, see what makes him tick!

    Kidnap the Sandy Claws, chop him into bits!
    Mr. Oogie Boogie is sure to get his kicks!

    Kidnap the Sandy Claws, see what we will see,
    Lock him in a cage and then, throw away the key!

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12370 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    who tried to fix the chaos of fire and storm head and rain and empires of foliage and flower in pigment and ash

    Beautiful - more o that in 09 please, Craig.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19743 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    You might even firm the resolve of that Littlewood character.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19743 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie,

    Not intended as anything particularly insightful, more an interesting pattern - a high proportion of the great childrens' authors - Dodgson, Anderson, Potter, Nesbit, Farjeon, Lewis, Jansson, as a few examples - were childless.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    David: I realise thatr no one has been near this discussion since the Christmas crackers were on the warmer but I have nearly finished My First Stabbing. I kept it for a January treat. It is tremendous. It is as if you have read my list of serious horrors/the things I abhore viz weddings, leaky babies, dim memories of school brutality (you didn't have school cadets too?).
    Passed one story on to my wife--it has been some time since I have heard her LOL at a book. I will savour the remaining few stories

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2562 posts Report Reply

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