Island Life by David Slack

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Island Life: The Grouse is done to a turn, my Lord.

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  • Damian Christie,

    You know you'll have all the pedants ablaze with that one David... why don't you just add whale and dolphin to your "fish" list and be done with it.

    While I'm here though, a big YES to the pan fried snapper, the fresher the better, and also to some smoked kahawai.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 1164 posts Report Reply

  • David Slack,

    you just add whale and dolphin to your "fish" list and be done with it.

    What, are you telling me they taste like chicken?

    Devonport • Since Nov 2006 • 599 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    *Fresh bluecod fillets, dipped in egg & then flour, & fried
    *smoked roe
    *flounders, fried whole (after gutting)
    *eel, especially silverbelly
    *greenbone
    *smoked monkfish (fresh is excellent too)

    ...damn, now I'm hungry!

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    O, and since molluscs and crustacea have happily been included-

    *titi!

    (Hurries away to make a sandwich with some remanants of last night's dinner...)

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • David Slack,

    *titi!

    Yes! I nearly added that one myself. Had it in a risotto a while after I wrote this.
    Bloody marvellous.

    You have the advantage of me with greenbone, though. Never heard of it. Please go on...

    Devonport • Since Nov 2006 • 599 posts Report Reply

  • Mark Easterbrook,

    Or if you prepare seabirds, the Tern's been done grouse, mate.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 265 posts Report Reply

  • John,

    David,
    I am so pleased that you have been wise enough to omit Tuna from your list.

    Kina might be the one that really finishes Dr Smith off though , as I understand that his family dynasty , like the Bill English family, has a history of beef protein rather than kai moana.

    Auckland • Since Dec 2007 • 21 posts Report Reply

  • Mark Easterbrook,

    I meant "prefer", not "prepare", but it still kind of makes sense. Kind of.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 265 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Greenbone is butterfish is marari is kelpcod is Odax pullus...greenbone because it has bones coloured a delicate bluegreen, and butterfish because it is absolutely delicious. It's an art to catch them because they only eat seaweed (and only one variety of seaweed -Ecklonia radiata) and I share my method of doing so only with young family.

    *frostfish

    is another I add to educating-Lockwood list (there's a really escoteric little book called "Hunting Frostfish With A Shotgun" - the gun to keep off the gulls (and other early beachwanderers I suspect...)

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • George Darroch,

    For vegetarians among us, there's a place in Kingsland that sells some pretty tasty fake fish. And if you're feeling adventurous, you could try their "vegetarian fish flavoured beef".

    WLG • Since Nov 2006 • 2264 posts Report Reply

  • Rik,

    I think snapper peaks about 1 day after being caught...bit too tough when it first comes out!

    Since Jun 2007 • 130 posts Report Reply

  • David Slack,

    vegetarian fish flavoured beef

    That's sounds like an uncannily accurate description of the meal John Key is serving the voters. Add Mark's preferred meat and you'll get a Tern for the worse.

    I like the sound of dinner at Islander's place.

    Devonport • Since Nov 2006 • 599 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Enjoyed your essay David, and the link (though that bloke knows buggerall about cooking birds...he's advocating a way of removing some of the salt that is inefficient, and his cooking method...o dear me! My birds, freshies or salted titi from a poha or bucket, are tender, with crisped skin, a real gourmet delight...)

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Beard,

    - Sarde in saor (though I prefer the version with pinenuts and sultanas)
    - Smoked warehou & potato hash at Floriditas
    - Gravlax
    - Tapanade with plenty of anchovy
    - Kedgeree
    - Smoked eel with horseradish
    - Fish & chips (in an open cone) from Mickey's near Paddington Station

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 1040 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    One of my neighbours - who has an exclusive carpark for Latvians - introduced me to a deliciousness from his birth country. Little brown very very dead fish.*
    Unfortunately he neglected to warn me they are addictive...

    Thanks for that mate!

    But he makes an incredibly good gravlax (we catch salmon fresh in from the sea here) and his lightly cured salmon eggs are to die for (so all is forgiven. Really. Just send us another little round tin or a hundred.)




    *Smoked Riga sprats. Right up there with the best aged Norwegian brisling-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Bryan Dods,

    Kina might be the one that really finishes Dr Smith off though , as I understand that his family dynasty , like the Bill English family, has a history of beef protein rather than kai moana.

    The Smiths, from Matakohe, have probably eaten their share of mullet from the Kaipara harbour.
    Maybe that's the kind of dead fish he doesn't like.

    Ti-tree smoke helps hide the muddy flavour. It might be hard to swallow without the added carcinogens.

    Northland • Since Nov 2006 • 46 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Williams,

    Kina might be the one that really finishes Dr Smith off though , as I understand that his family dynasty , like the Bill English family, has a history of beef protein rather than kai moana.

    Indeed, many years ago (1991 I think) Lockwood spent an evening regaling student politicians about his bovine expertise (and sculling expertise too); he was very good humoured (his idiot press secretary however was a drunken buffoon).

    Sydney • Since Nov 2006 • 2273 posts Report Reply

  • Mark Easterbrook,

    I think National's trying to serve up a fishy tasting turducken.

    Take a large helping of bull, stuff it with a turkey, which in turn is stuffed with a tern, which in turn is stuffed with interns recording the stuffing of a lame duck.


    Is it home time yet?

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 265 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Campbell,

    I think they're more floundering at the moment ...

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 2622 posts Report Reply

  • Eric Olthwaite,

    I hear Lone Star do a fried fish and chips, with a Scotch on the rocks if you wait long enough.

    Auckland • Since May 2007 • 20 posts Report Reply

  • Testcard,

    Didn't Key go on that Gone Fishin' show to demonstrate how good he was at swallowing dead fish?

    Since Nov 2007 • 23 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    Once again, I find myself swimming somewhat against the tide (to coin a fishy type phrase). I don't really like fish. Anything that tastes of the sea isn't my idea of delicious - although I do love prawns, and crab, and shrimp, and crayfish. I do like fish and chips, and I love smoked salmon (the thin cut type, not the fillety one). Whitebait fritters - yes, I quite like them, and do enjoy a good taramasalata. But any sort of shellfish? No, thankyou!

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3136 posts Report Reply

  • Raymond A Francis,

    Islander, I would love to get my feet under your table

    PS I could provide whitebait! (only 8 days to season start)

    45' South • Since Nov 2006 • 578 posts Report Reply

  • Keith Ng,

    Mmmm.

    Crabmeat pie in Chile

    Lobster-sized king prawns in India

    Kina and tuna sushi at the Tsukiji Fish Market in Japan

    But, bless, the fish and chips in Kaikoura still takes the cake.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 543 posts Report Reply

  • Bart Janssen,

    nieuwe haring

    mmmmm

    My father told me to try this when I went to Amsterdam to explore my roots and it was every bit as good as he said.

    I even had some vacuum packed and brought it back to NZ for him, not quite new but 24 hours old. The customs guys were bemused but obviously figured that anybody silly enough to declare raw herring wasn't worth searching :).

    cheers
    Bart

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 4460 posts Report Reply

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