Hard News by Russell Brown

Read Post

Hard News: What Now?

926 Responses

First ←Older Page 1 6 7 8 9 10 38 Newer→ Last

  • Sacha, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    Wasn't one of those convicted in the last few days a Pike River contractor

    Is that one of the people arrested for interfering with emergency operations on that first day? How sad.

    not looting, but something else)

    I was only talking about looting - and yes, I can imagine the poorer suburbs having more reason to go there. But I'd rather not assume those two guys caught stealing three generators are misunderstood heroes of the people, thanks. I'm aware of organised grassroots resource networks active in some suburbs but I doubt they'd appreciate being tarred with that brush.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19735 posts Report Reply

  • Ross Mason,

    Sophie, These first few days are such "a time". Their actions are just "not the right thing to do". The cellmate comment was for rapists in prison. Surely there is no comparison and it was an appalling comment from an MP anyway. Sho should be leaving any administration of justice to the departments that democracy has decided should dish it out. Police: Find the suspect, put them on trial. Thats their job, Everything else after that they should have no comment. After this week or the next or so I can understand if folk resort to other tactics if things are not going their way or help is not forthcoming. Then I would probably be willing to show some sympathy.

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1590 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to Ross Mason,

    Yes, I am always hoping for a better society that takes care of each other and unfortunately I just bat for the underdog in hope of understanding. I actually felt really sad to see 2 young people taking those generators and even more saddened to see a 16 year old who had been so bitter. Says to me we are failing in certain areas as a society. Anyhow as you were (it's only me, but my name has an "F" no "PH" for future reference :) but I sincerely do hope we don't get an increase in thieving.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • SteveH,

    Wasn’t one of those convicted in the last few days a Pike River contractor (not looting, but something else)? Sounds like he needs major psychological help, not condemnation.

    I think you're referring to the guy who claimed to be qualified for USAR but turned out to be not qualified at all: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/natural-disasters/news/article.cfm?c_id=68&objectid=10709278
    He's been charged but not convicted.

    Since Sep 2009 • 444 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Beard, in reply to Andrew Stevenson,

    I believe that @thomasbeagle was trying to get the data made public. Having the info on a LIM is alright if you are a buyer or owner. But how about if you are a tennant, employee or your children will go to school or creche in one those buildings?

    The earthquake-prone letters that go to building owners from WCC have the following text: "Information regarding the potentially earthquake prone status of the building, including this letter, is publicly available on request and will be included in Land and Project Information Memoranda (LIMs and PIMs)". While LIMs cost money, the wording suggests that it should be available, possibly en masse, via a LGOIMA request. Given the recent proactive release of GIS data by the council, one might hope that such a request would be expected. Also, most (perhaps all? it's not my field) earthquake-prone buildings have to display the notice externally.

    Bear in mind that the assessments are largely based upon a combination of external visual inspection and plans lodged with the council, so the engineers have to make a lot of assumptions.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 1040 posts Report Reply

  • Ross Mason,

    but my name has an "F" no "PH" for

    .

    Sorry, Habit. I have a niece with a ph.

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1590 posts Report Reply

  • Gareth Ward,

    Re "the number" (ghastly as it is) the senior police figures are now using 240 as a total number of confirmed dead and missing-feared-dead.

    And the rebuilding thing is going to be interesting when laid against Brownlee's comments (paraphrased) of "a heavily insured country which will see huge capital inflows". Given most of those CBD buildings are privately owned, there will be a whole series of corporate private owners that receive significant insurance payouts (direct from their insurer I presume, without EQC involvement?) to rebuild. If you want to shape what they build you can really only do that through pretty strict local planning laws and building codes and I'm not confident that central and local government won't just see that as more "redtape" that "increases costs on people when they least need it". The first story of somebody being blocked from "just rebuilding their home" because "some damn Greeny is trying to force me to go through three commitees and tell me how to build it" will be leapt upon...

    Auckland, NZ • Since Mar 2007 • 1727 posts Report Reply

  • Ross Mason,

    Found this from SF Museum from Mark Twain.

    Scenes reminiscent....

    Also, probably from a bit further on in the same book but can't find it:

    I will set it down here as a maxim that the operations of the human intellect are much accelerated by an earthquake. Usually I do not think rapidly--but I did upon this occasion. I thought rapidly, vividly, and distinctly. With the first shock of the five, I thought--"I recognize that motion--this is an earthquake." With the second, I thought, "What a luxury this will be for the morning papers." With the third shock, I thought, "Well my boy, you had better be getting out of this." Each of these thoughts was only the hundredth part of a second in passing through my mind. There is no incentive to rapid reasoning like an earthquake. I then sidled out toward the middle of the street- and I may say that I sidled out with some degree of activity, too. There is nothing like an earthquake to hurry a man when he starts to go anywhere.

    Mark Twain - "The Great Earthquake in San Francisco," New York Weekly Review, 11/25/1865

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1590 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Gareth Ward,

    The first story of somebody being blocked from "just rebuilding their home" because "some damn Greeny is trying to force me to go through three commitees and tell me how to build it" will be leapt upon.

    Shaping the argument is really important - reminding people that "red tape" saved many lives; highlighting future challenges; showing them what other inspiring cities look like.

    Then explaining what it takes to get there - coordinated and expert planning for the future as well as the now, with all parties around the table and a long-term commitment.

    The alternative is cheap knee-jerk individualism that gifts our children and theirs a crap place to live if we can persuade them to stay here at all. We just need to show them large chunks of Auckland's cbd to illustrate that option.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19735 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    Just going back to monuments and the cathedral, it struck us today while we were sitting on the front porch having a gin with our friend Andrew that, somewhere in the rubble, are the Cathedral bells. They'll be knocked about, but largely intact. And they could make a lovely memorial - with the uneasy caveat that they will have killed people, probably.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4651 posts Report Reply

  • Dave Waugh,

    At the end of the day I can't help but think that true to the NZ way, Christchurch will be rebuilt in the classic NZ style of "Leaky". :o(
    Developers will almost always go for the cheapest option to then flog off as the perfect property.


    I'm also expecting National to use this as an excuse to accelerate welfare reform/cuts as "We need to save money to pay for Christchurch"..... i am wondering if the EQC insurance scheme will also become a target?

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 98 posts Report Reply

  • Rob Stowell,

    I’d love to see the CBD rebuilt full of life and future facing. First thoughts are:
    A city that feels light, airy, and strong. The first Europeans here wanted the solidity of stone that harked back to a European past, made them feel secure about their future here. It doesn’t seem secure any more, and we should face the future. A city designed to be post-oil is an intriguing notion.
    And a city centre that’s not a collection of great square towers. Maybe a six-storey limit, with a few exceptions. There’s no great need to build massive towers.
    I’d like to add: a city built for beauty. But we’d argue forever and roll fighting into the Avon, to drown or be poisoned :)

    Whakaraupo • Since Nov 2006 • 2110 posts Report Reply

  • 81stcolumn,

    I'm also expecting National to use this as an excuse to accelerate welfare reform/cuts as "We need to save money to pay for Christchurch"..... i am wondering if the EQC insurance scheme will also become a target?

    Not exactly welfare but....that'l be working for families and student loans. Bill wouldn't dream of rolling back tax cuts.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10709454

    FWIW. Bin the holiday highway for a start....

    Nawthshaw • Since Nov 2006 • 790 posts Report Reply

  • Robyn Gallagher, in reply to Islander,

    Why not a transparent Cathedral spire?
    Tempered glass and a wholly holy view?

    I've been interested to discover that the cathedral spire has sustained previous earthquake damage and been rebuilt. Quakes in 1881, 1888 and 1901 damaged the spire, with the tip being rebuilt in timber and copper, lighter than the previous builds in brick and stone.

    So perhaps it's now time for another tip for the spire to meet the needs of Christchurch 2011.

    Raglan • Since Nov 2006 • 1946 posts Report Reply

  • Caleb D'Anvers,

    It's so depressingly predictable to see the Nats implementing a bit of disaster capitalism on the back on the earthquake. "It's an emergency, right? We all have to make sacrifices, OK? Oh, except for the highest income earners and the blessed business sector."

    London SE16 • Since Mar 2008 • 482 posts Report Reply

  • Christopher Dempsey,

    I object to an idiot taking antique door knobs.

    So would I in normal circumstances but something made me stop; door knobs when all that is going on around you? This morning we find out why.

    Parnell / Tamaki-Auckland… • Since Sep 2008 • 659 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia,

    Oh dear, I think The Standard just made a funny:

    I’m really pissed off that politics has come into the Christchurch earthquake so quickly.

    Ah, yes… because there’s nothing “ideological” and “political” about deciding you already know what the evil Tories are going to do before they do it. Of course, it would have been just as “political” – and without an electoral mandate, which seems to be furrowing Peter Dunne’s brow this morning – if English had announced that every tax cut passed over the last decade was being reversed, in conjunction with increases in company and personal tax, but I guess it ain’t “political” or “ideological” if you agree with it.

    FFS, I’ve come to accept that the Kiwibog-Standardista Axis of Hackery is what it is, but I wish they were a little less prone to projection. Or at the very least, if you're going to play politics own your shit.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12370 posts Report Reply

  • stever@cs.waikato.ac.nz,

    So, when is it OK to talk in a political way about the future?

    I'd say that when the deputy PM says that everything is on the table for discussion, though makes it clear some things are more on the table than others, then he has started the political discussion,.

    At which point, if others don't join in and consider the pros and cons, they are neglecting their duty.

    Hamilton • Since Nov 2006 • 73 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    Christopher, I fear that this is the tip of the iceberg. People with autism will already be very stressed by the earthquake, and will have all sorts of reactions that others won't understand. I hope he gets some help now.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3222 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia, in reply to stever@cs.waikato.ac.nz,

    First, since I was one of the people who asked Russell to open this thread so we could get political without insensitively treading over other more reflective threads, I obviously think there is a time and place for politics. But we're also not pretending we're not doing it.

    I’d say that when the deputy PM says that everything is on the table for discussion, though makes it clear some things are more on the table than others

    Really? This is a lot less "clear' to me than it obviously is to you:

    Mr English said in terms of income support the Government would continue to "protect the vulnerable" – a likely signal that cuts to Working for Families would be limited to those on high incomes. A highly placed Government source said advice from the Treasury included the option of a higher abatement rate on Working for Families payments, meaning those on higher incomes would receive less.

    It could also tighten the eligibility criteria and examine ways to make the student loan scheme "more affordable", though this would not see an end to interest-free loans.

    "Will there be radical changes? No," the source said.

    And despite what some people are claiming, I've seen no evidence that English has explicitly ruled out deferring the April 1 business tax cut. Please correct me if I'm wrong., 'cause we're #biasedtoreality around here.

    If we were in some Fringe-style alter-verse where Michael Cullen was still Finance Minister/Deputy PM, I'm sure he could say exactly the same thing as English and the Kiwibog would seething with assumptions that the God-damned Liarbore Dykeocracy was softening up the plebs for more envy tax. I'd still say that it might be worth rtaking a deep breath until there was something solid to argue about. IMO and YMMV, of course.

    FWIW, I broadly agree with Bernard Hickey here. I'd even go a bit further and cynically (if, perhaps counterintuitively) argue that a small increase in the top personal tax rate and company tax, with a clear sunset clause and all income clearly ring-fenced for quake recovery, would not only be fair but good politics. It not only would drive the Kiwiboggers fucking insane, but while Labour and the Greens would argue it doesn't go far enough, they wouldn't vote against it.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12370 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Semmens,

    where Michael Cullen was still Finance Minister/Deputy PM

    The Craig bot strikes again.

    There is a fun-filled drinking game in this.

    Sevilla, Espana • Since Nov 2006 • 2217 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Semmens,

    The curious response of Key opens him to serious accusations of being a plutocrat who is not prepared to share the burden of the recovery fairly.

    Key (and the rest of the rich?) seemingly think they can cheer our efforts to save the SS Christchurch from a well-appointed super-yacht, and will only carefully clamber back aboard once the rest of us emerge dirty, soaked and exhausted from our damage control efforts and declare the everything ship shape and Bristol fashion.

    Or it may just be that Key and English are so wedded to the voodoo economics of trickle down (and Victorian morality) that their administration is an economic one trick pony with no more ideas in it’s intellectual cupboard.

    But the Herald’s editorial today makes the point well. We are willing to be taxed a bit extra to save Christchurch and preserve our social safety net. Put a sunset clause in the legislation if you must. But just do it.

    Sevilla, Espana • Since Nov 2006 • 2217 posts Report Reply

  • 81stcolumn,

    Awww c'mon Craig I wasn't being quite that bad.

    Changes to a planned cut in business tax on April 1 had not been considered.

    Despte the fact that it will cause problems here in the cardboard-cup towers I agree on interest free student loans. They had to change - just a question of when.

    Nawthshaw • Since Nov 2006 • 790 posts Report Reply

  • JLM, in reply to Emma Hart,

    Re the cathedral bells, the fallen bells at the Marienkirche in Lubeck, left as a memorial when rebuilt after air-raid destruction, are what I remember most clearly 30 years later.

    Judy Martin's southern sl… • Since Apr 2007 • 241 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia, in reply to Tom Semmens,

    The Craig bot strikes again.

    @Tom: Do you actually disagree that if Cullen was still finance minister today the Kiwibog would have been throwing out enough methane to speed up global warming by a couple of decades? If so, +10,000 points for endearing naivete, but I don’t see any evidence to change my view that Kiwibog and the Sub-Standard are now, and ever shall be, substantial net contributors to anthropogenic global stupidity.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12370 posts Report Reply

First ←Older Page 1 6 7 8 9 10 38 Newer→ Last

Post your response…

Please sign in using your Public Address credentials…

Login

You may also create an account or retrieve your password.