Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: About Campbell Live

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  • Ian Dalziel,

    … and there’s the other shoe dropping!
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/67680191/mediaworks-starts-singing-a-new-tune

    MediaWorks has signed a deal with Australia’s Channel Nine to run a New Zealand version of its successful Nine Live business. CEO Mark Weldon says the deal will mean entertainment events that would not normally come to New Zealand will now come here.

    Weldon says the move in to live entertainment worked for MediaWorks as it would control promotion of the shows or exhibitions.

    “If you get a big act like One D, part of that is you get exclusive rights to that act,” he said.
    That meant in New Zealand the exclusive interviews would go to shows like Paul Henry on television and, depending on the target demographic, to radio station like George FM, Mai FM and Radio Live.

    So if you have an act they appear on your news, they appear on your morning breakfast, they appear on radio stations and you probably stream the concert.
    “So you get to create content and play that content on radio, tv and digital.”

    There’s yer news, now dance to it!

    here's the interview with Weldon;
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/67676498/mark-weldon-mediaworks-man-of-the-moment
    read and weep - (faux) 'reality' is here to stay...

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7953 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia, in reply to Cecelia,

    It’s hard to argue this case without sounding callous but I believe that Simon was arguing that “Campbell Live is the last bastion of current affairs journalism” is a romantic view of Campbell rather than the reality. In fact there are lots of snippets that are frustratingly lacking in depth

    Fair enough -- but I don't think I'm the only person who has been going to some pains to say "Campbell Live is very far from perfect, but it's really something I'd rather not lose".

    But to be entirely cynical nor is it very useful -- or intellectually honest -- to engage in the starry-eyed romanticism of statements like (as simon puts it) "Hoping a private channel does serious journalism is no substitute for having a public channel that’s obliged to." I'd very strongly recommend Jean Seaton's Pinkoes and Traitors: The BBC and The Nation, 1974-1987 for a bracing reality check on any nostalgic pining for some golden age that never really existed.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12370 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    read and weep - (faux) 'reality' is here to stay...

    So when do we become another state of Australia? Sorted the dollar, got information sorted and how about that flag eh?
    Shifting any information to Sunday viewing is convenient for our Dickeytator and his buddy Mark money, money, who wouldn't "remember" and wouldn't have to answer to anyone, thus our Propaganda machine can go into action with a pic of some boyband introduced by a selfie with our PM.Christie has all her eggs in a row . Jono and Ben can kiss their careers goodbye. Hell, we'll get more news from 7 Days, as long as we can guess what the screenshot is about.
    As Barnes said earlier, "it's part of a bigger picture" coming to us Crosby Textor, (money, money, money) style with "Bubbles and bagels"
    I'm now truly disgusted in this New World Order that has taken 7 years to implement in what once was, Paradise.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    And, what choice is there for the journos? I was disgusted that anyone would leave News to go work for Steven Joyce, thought that was unethical, but now I see if the likes of Rachel Morton wants to stoop that low, (and Sia Aston in the Dictators office WTF?) then it must be, eat shit at TV3

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • izogi, in reply to BenWilson,

    I kind of struggle with the inherent apathy involved in even watching free to air live TV, with it’s complete surrender of any responsibility for choice about what one’s mind is subjected to beyond pressing channel and mute buttons, but I’m well aware it’s what millions of people do actually like to do in NZ

    On this I’m guessing this is all as much a thing of human nature that’s being assisted by the internet’s availability. The ’net encourages its own problems of apathy with the ease in seeking out like-minded silo’d communities, using them for self-justification of preconceived opinions. Popular internet platforms, like Facebook, actively assist with this polarisation.

    Lately TV media seems to be gradually becoming just another silo’d community of like-minded thinking, and maybe it’s market forces as a consequence of the internet’s ubiquity. When the modern age lets viewers switch off and go elsewhere for a more agreeable and self-reassuring source of information at any time, why alienate the audience you have by suggesting there are different opinions out there?

    Not to suggest everything was all fine and objective before these modern times began, of course.

    Wellington • Since Jan 2007 • 1142 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Herald threw up this gem this morn.
    Cannot use his own name ffs!

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Cecelia, in reply to Craig Ranapia,

    Thanks, Craig. I'll check out "Pinkoes and Traitors".

    I enjoyed Q&A this am, not the bit on dollar parity so much but the section on city planning and the Greek economy. Good and relevant causes, passionate people, engaged interviewers and presenters. (We have to forgive Hannah DP for the Slater piece on Seven Sharp) Why wouldn't the rest of NZ want to see that sort of thing packaged with the news? Before it I saw 15 minutes of "Attitude". Once again, fascinating. Maybe I am feeling a bit of Golden Age nostalgia but I kind of think we had that sort of TV in prime time back in the 70s to 90s???!!!

    As for Golden Ages of TV, isn't there one going on in parts of the world, USA, France, Scandinavia, UK (?): The Wire, Breaking Bad, True Detective, The Bridge, The Killing, Borgen, Spiral, Transparent, Mad Men, Black Mirror, The Missing.

    Hibiscus Coast • Since Apr 2008 • 559 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to Cecelia,

    I enjoyed Q&A this am, not the bit on dollar parity so much but the section on city planning and the Greek economy. Good and relevant causes, passionate people, engaged interviewers and presenters. (We have to forgive Hannah DP for the Slater piece on Seven Sharp) Why wouldn't the rest of NZ want to see that sort of thing packaged with the news

    Does anyone know if Campbell Live format changed when Weldon and Christie came on board? Was that why we got more fluffy ducks and less investigative journalism ?

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Rae Sott, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    Perhaps we make this an issue with Labour and the Greens, all governments in a free society should be proud to have their feet held to the fire, because as long as that is able to happen, the more assured we can be that we may be being governed well

    Hamilton • Since Apr 2015 • 21 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Sofie Bribiesca,

    Herald threw up this gem this morn.
    Cannot use his own name ffs!

    There was me thinking this was gonna be about Campbell 'lawyering up' against TV3...
    Who knows possibly they might have a restriction of trade or 'Brand' contract with him - in which case may I humbly suggest a more generic and 'commodious' investigative reporting show:
    'On the John!' aka Bottomline - We cover all the bases!
    other slogans may occur to you...

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7953 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    TV3 news boss Mark Jennings says NZers are "time poor" as he cuts Sunday 6pm news bulletin to half an hour. The other half hour is a downsized and renamed 3rd Degree current affairs show for which NZonAir recently funded the expensive investigative journalism component.

    Wonder if TV3 might do same during the week? Screen CampbellLive at 6.30 then at 7 maybe a gameshow or comedy format like Christie seems to be gagging for, or even a sports show like Crowd Goes Wild?

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19745 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to izogi,

    But if JC manages to stay in a vaguely comparable role, I think I'd like to see the news shortened to something much faster and more direct, then have someone similar to himself come in soon after and look at the more important stuff in more detail.

    snap

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19745 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    and another snap

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19745 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie, in reply to Sofie Bribiesca,

    Does anyone know if Campbell Live format changed when Weldon and Christie came on board? Was that why we got more fluffy ducks and less investigative journalism ?

    As one of the (apparently) few people who watch CL nightly, I'd have to say that we noticed a distinct style change this year. Possibly an attempt to make the show zippier (more yoof orientated?) as well as some blatant cross-promotion for TV3's reality shows like The Block.

    Stylewise CL has always contained a mix of soft and hard stories, as you'd expect from a magazine format primetime show.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1440 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Revealing interview with CEO Mark Weldon about his plans for Mediaworks.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19745 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie, in reply to Sacha,

    Revealing interview with CEO Mark Weldon about his plans for Mediaworks.

    Yet more Reality Hell
    "The Bachelor, X Factor, The Block, MasterChef and Dancing with the Stars are now Weldon's life. They are, he says, "a pretty killer lineup".

    God help us all.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1440 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Alfie,

    I can see the logic but I sure wouldn't be investing in it. Mind you, banks and others have a history of stupidity with TV3.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19745 posts Report Reply

  • Euan Mason, in reply to Alfie,

    Lose CL and it’s the Henry/Hoskings “All hail the great leader!” show.

    I used sing and play guitar in restaurants, and from time to time I'd bring out at a rather realistic monkey puppet called, "Buckminster". One evening when Buckminster was doing his thing I heard a woman exclaim, "Hey look! A monkey! Is it real, honey, is it real? It's real isn't it?". To which her husband answered, "Jeez, I hope not because look where he has his hand!".

    I think of Buckminster when I see Hosking on Seven Sharp speaking of, or to the Prime Minister.

    Canterbury • Since Jul 2008 • 259 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Euan Mason,

    applause

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19745 posts Report Reply

  • simon g,

    I don’t believe there was a “golden age” of NZ news and current affairs on telly, and I’m well aware that nostalgia can distort.

    But if we measure hours and slots, something more quantifiable than our opinions, then there has clearly been a reduction in “serious” programming. For example:

    - TV One used to have regular programmes of a commercial hour, in prime time, usually on a weekday. They had various names – e.g. Assignment – and they were a mix of local and imported items. Hardly perfect, but at least they existed. They’re gone now (apart from an apologetic half-hour on Sunday, a sort of “let’s get this token out of the way before the stuff we’re really here for”).

    - TV One had election interviews – again, weekday evenings, and again a full programme (commercial half hour or hour). For example, Kim Hill in 2005 grilled all the party leaders at length – a real interviewer, who got to say “After the break, more questions”, not “After the break, cats and dogs”.

    - International elections were covered in great detail. Richard Long presented live coverage of UK, US and Australian election nights, dropping into the local broadcasters and interviewing studio guests. Yes, this all happened – for hours on end.

    - TVNZ had an Asia bureau (fronted by the likes of Charlotte Glennie). How I laughed (“a vast continent, one correspondent, that’s a joke!”). It’s long gone.

    These things existed, they don’t exist any more. That’s not pining for a “golden age”, because it wasn’t. But it was still a good deal more than TV One offers us today.

    The real anger-maker is not just the retreat from information TV, but the absurd self-image of TVNZ. The glossy promos pretend that nothing has changed. If they just said “We’re on the net now, this channel ain’t doing boring no more”, that would at least be honest. But they are continuing to maintain a fiction, while changing the facts.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1332 posts Report Reply

  • simon g,

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1332 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to simon g,

    TVNZ had an Asia bureau (fronted by the likes of Charlotte Glennie)

    She was so good. And yes to your overall point. We have shed our public broadcasting expecations like simmering frogs.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19745 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie, in reply to simon g,

    I don’t believe there was a “golden age” of NZ news and current affairs on telly, and I’m well aware that nostalgia can distort.

    Maybe not a golden age, but television was certainly more honest in the early days -- especially when it came to news and current affairs. People like Simon Walker, Brian Edwards and Ian Johnson were serious journos who knew their stuff. Stories were produced with a genuine journalistic ethic -- more of a BBC-inspired diet than the Fox News Fast Food we're force-fed these days.

    "To find out more, let's cross live to a junior journo who's somewhere less than ten kilometres from the place where the incident actually occurred several hours earlier."

    TV technology has advanced in leaps and bounds. It's a pity that quality content has tended to head in the other direction.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1440 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Campbell,

    Seems to me that anyone pushing for a Fox News right slanted news sort of media world for NZ is probably making a commercial mistake - because you know that if they do, and labour and the Greens get back in, and they eventually will, they will retaliate not by making a competing lefty channel but by making a real independent public television network, probably merging it with Radio NZ - that's going to mean more, tax payer funded, competition for for-profit TV which wont be good for them in the long run

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 2622 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes, in reply to simon g,

    For example, Kim Hill in 2005 grilled all the party leaders at length – a real interviewer, who got to say “After the break, more questions”, not “After the break, cats and dogs”.

    Well what do you expect from a journalist who's name is an anagram of "Kill Him" ? Had 'em scared I can tell you.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

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