Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: The Social Retail

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  • Gareth Ward,

    opening up a farmers market in the area

    How about in the bottom of the So-hole Square? Might as well make the damn thing useful...

    Auckland, NZ • Since Mar 2007 • 1727 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    "So, ha ha. I was describing this very blog post in the supermarket tonight (produce section), and happened at that very moment to see my go-to wine guy buying mushrooms."

    The Dunedinistas have put James on a contract to bring PAS to the people not privileged enough to have internet access.

    No thanks necessary Russell.

    It's like he's not just retweeting me, he's actually acting out the blog post IRL .

    That's ... art.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22849 posts Report Reply

  • Carol Stewart,

    Has anyone seen Sanguinello/Blood Oranges on sale in NZ?

    And while on obscure produce, does anyone know where I could get fresh tomatillos? They make fantastic salsa verde but are very hard to get in Wellington.

    Wellington • Since Jul 2008 • 830 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    Has anyone seen Sanguinello/Blood Oranges on sale in NZ?

    There were some at my local greengrocer the other week. They freaked the hell out of my daughter, and largely it's only Daleks that do that.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4651 posts Report Reply

  • Rachel Prosser,

    I've just come in from buying meat for dinner from the local butcher on Cranford St. A real plus is that it comes in the portion size that suits (and it's on my walking route). Long may it survive!

    It's quite old-school - quality at an affordable price is the target, with labels written in spidery handwriting. Other butchers compete on quality (Peter Timbs, Verkerks, or by packaging (Barrington has lots of Meat Packs - buy a week's worth for a fixed sum).

    When in town I'm a big fan of Verkerks butchery - they have offcuts of things like pastrami and roastbeef at very reasonable prices. Plus things like chicken frames for soup. mmmm!

    In Grey Lynn, it's quite impressive that Fruit World can survive across the road from a big Woolworths.

    I suspect they survive because they're across the road - means you can get both in one trip.

    Has anyone seen Sanguinello/Blood Oranges on sale in NZ?

    Blood Oranges are available in Christchurch - my flatmate received 3 as a gift last week.

    Christchurch • Since Mar 2008 • 228 posts Report Reply

  • Stephen Judd,

    Blood Oranges are available in Christchurch - my flatmate received 3 as a gift last week.

    What, has she time-travelled to 1947 England?

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 3122 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Has anyone seen Sanguinello/Blood Oranges on sale in NZ,

    Yes, got one in ma fridge, I have a watermelon salad I make and my cheffy mate suggested I add said orange to my salad because he thinks the colour, texture etc is the clincher to a not only yummy but good looking salad. The Green Rebel (of which there is a few dotted around Auckland) was where I purchased it and that's 1/2 way down Dominion Rd. Salad is, thinly sliced red/Purple( you know what I mean) onion, cubed watermelon,pieces of the blood orange and cubed feta. drizzle olive oil, squeeze of lemon or balsamic or whatever. That's it.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Struth Sofie, that salad sounds *scrumptious*! Chances of me making it are somewhat limited, but I've tucked the recipe away, just in case-

    Amy Gale -ah hah! Just like fish names, different areas call the same foods different names...you are describing (I think!) the classic scone mix(we rub the butter in, rather than cut it), which is either cooked on a girdle or -more usually these days- in an oven. They tend to be plain, cheese, herbed or -and this is the major sweet one - date. But anything goes...pumpkin/kumara/wholemeal/bacon-

    And I loved your popcorn soundscape! And realised why mine is so different - I've never cooked popcorn in a pot! Just in strange microwaveable bags that one of my family was hawking once. The results tasted yuk (like the virulently coloured & sweet popcorn of my youth), so I never pursued popcorn-cooking-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Struth Sofie, that salad sounds *scrumptious*!

    'Tis. The concept is kinda odd but once you have a bite, it is a delightful, surprising tastebud titillation.I marinate my own feta in an olive oil herbal mix so I throw in my marinated feta and the touch of chilli does it wonders. It's one of ma favs.:)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Thanks Sofie! Those extra little hints (chilli & ownmix-marinated feta)
    are now factored in.

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • nz native,

    In reply to Steve barnes 'citation needed', my information about the casulization of their work force comes directly from a manager at a supermarket in wellington, out of a staff of over 100 they have 5 full time ( real job ) employees ...... It obviously makes employees cheaper.

    Likewise the information on their mark-ups comes from management.

    They maximise the mark-ups and profits on what should be the staples of a good diet.

    Its the corpritization of our food and its going to end up with obesity , diabete's and ill health all over the show.

    And they should keep the recreational drugs ( booze ) away from the food.

    If you want that drug go to the bottel shop.

    I feel sorry for all the 'dry' alcoholics having it rammed at them all the time.

    Since May 2007 • 60 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    nz native - no details, no citation, kinda illiterate post-

    I am wholly in agreement with the idea that supermarkets remove real provenance from foods they stock. Given the mass/ive market in some places (see Giovanni Tiso's comments apropos Mexico City) this seems to be a disease of cities.

    And spreads elsewhere-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    Islander - thanks for last night's gem recipe. I'm not much a baker, but there is someone here who is, and has gem iron.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3227 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    And spreads elsewhere-

    I am glad I live in the city
    I am glad my friends live all over the place.
    I am glad I get to choose anywhere I wanna be,anytime of the day
    I am glad to be here
    Thanks for having me
    :)
    Knowledge Bro'

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Ah, but those of us who live in cities here, live in relatively tiny ones (Mexico Megalopolis is 20 million plus) and we have, luckily, good internet connections, and I'm also glad to be here - and partake of your knowledge/wisdom :) Thanks for being!

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Hey Islander. Being a Mexicano, I hear you. My Mum and Dad told me that Sofie meant wisdom, so that's all good.Gracias Senorita.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    (Sofie, tuakana/elder sister(wisdomwise) - yeah, I knew about the Mexicana bit!)

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    :)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • TracyMac,

    Choku Bai Jo, in North Lyneham, if you happen to be round here.

    *waves at George*

    I'm in the happy situation of being 10 minutes' bike ride from Choku Baijo, but I could wish that they stayed open later on Saturdays.

    But really, if I'm out and about early enough on Saturdays, I go to the farmers' market at Epic Showgrounds, which is really da bomb. Sourdough bread, freshly roasted New Guinea peaberry from Wagonga coffee, the gourmet cake stall, the tofu/noodle/bean sprout lady, the organic spud man with his dozen varieties (with descriptions and recommended cooking methods), the free range or organic pork/beef/chook suppliers, the artisan cider people, the dukka/dips/olives people, the real chai stall (made with soy milk, and full of actual spices that have been boiled in the milky solution), apples from the Batlow orchards an hour away, the organic olive oil and locally pressed macadamia oil, the people selling hot sausage or bacon rolls, the old fella selling live chooks for the back yard.

    All that's really missing is a good cheese vendor (there is one, but his stuff is extremely expensive, and must be consumed within a few days).

    I'm glad to hear that the wheels are finally starting to turn for Auckland to get a farmers' market of its own. It's really taken long enough for a city of that size, and in a location that is surrounded by producers galore. Ok, there's always been Avondale and Otara markets, but that's often market gardeners getting rid of their odd ends. It be nice to get a good range of produce, not just of the vege kind.

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 701 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    What, has she time-travelled to 1947 England?

    My mother used to get oranges for Christmas. In the 50s! It was in Invercargill though. (AKA Scurvytown. ;) )

    I've only ever found canned tomatillos, Carol... but if you're going to do that, you might as well just buy the salsa verde in a tin from the same place and save yourself the bother.

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3828 posts Report Reply

  • Amy Gale,

    Amy Gale -ah hah! Just like fish names, different areas call the same foods different names...you are describing (I think!) the classic scone mix(we rub the butter in, rather than cut it),

    It's closely related, which I suppose is why the names are related, but a drop scone mix is way, way wetter - you end up splatting (ok, fine, drop ping) spoonfuls of it onto the tray, and they cook into shallow nubbly domes.

    I really like them. I'll dig out my recipe and post it next week.

    They tend to be plain, cheese, herbed or -and this is the major sweet one - date.

    In my memory of scone days when I was a kid, there were always both cheese and date scones to choose from. Quite often the date ones were made with wholemeal. And my mum never went in for this grating nonsense, it was good chunks of cheese from the kilo in the fridge. I really only make cheese ones these days, but I can never quite shake the feeling that I'm leaving the job half done.

    (Is it possible that I will now spend all weekend making scone variants? I think it is.)

    And I loved your popcorn soundscape! And realised why mine is so different - I've never cooked popcorn in a pot!

    Aw, thanks!

    I went home and made popcorn in a pot that very night. I'm going through a phase of rillyrilly liking what Americans call "kettle corn", which grabs you right in the salty-sweet pleasure center and doesn't let go:

    1) Put a bit of oil in the bottom of a big pot that has a lid, heat on high.
    (If you are used to making popcorn in a pot, put in a bit more oil than you usually do. If you're not, try 2 tablespoons the first time and refine later.)

    2) Add popcorn to make a single layer on the bottom.
    (Even if you usually add more, don't for this recipe. Too many of the unpopped kernels get glued to popped ones and carried to the top of the pot.)

    3) When it sizzles, add 1/4 cup of sugar. Put lid on. Turn heat down to medium.

    4) Shake through popping sequence. Pippity Bippity.

    5) Pour out into a bowl, sprinkle with salt (I like to grind mine extra fine w/ mortar and pestle but appreciate that this is not considered normal behavior).

    The pot will be somewhere between dirty and cataclysmically filthy. Do not fear. Run a couple of inches of water into it, put the lid back on, bring to the boil on the stove, then leave to soak. If your stove element retains enough heat you won't even need to turn it back on, and then you can go off and start eating straight away.

    tha Ith • Since May 2007 • 471 posts Report Reply

  • Christopher Dempsey,

    I'm glad to hear that the wheels are finallystarting to turn for Auckland to get a farmers' market of its own. It's really taken long enough for a city of that size, and in a location that is surrounded by producers galore.

    Oh it's got a few already - Parnell, Britomart, La Cigale, Alexandra Racecourse, so the wheels are turning to get them into other suburbs where one would be much appreciated, like Point Chevalier.

    Parnell / Tamaki-Auckland… • Since Sep 2008 • 659 posts Report Reply

  • Carol Stewart,

    I've only ever found canned tomatillos, Carol

    I bought some fresh ones earlier in the summer at .. Moore Wilsons (where else?). They weren't particularly expensive so I guess that means they were grown here rather than imported. But no luck since.

    I'm so looking forward to your drop scone recipe, Amy.

    In her book 'Feast', Nigella lawson waxes enthusiastic (even more than usual) about something called Hachapuri, which is a Georgian cheesebread with feta, ricotta and mozzarella. She tried it in St Petersburg, had many attempts to replicate the recipe at home, and finally had a Proustian moment at a Georgian cafe in Hackney (and got the recipe).

    Wellington • Since Jul 2008 • 830 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    so the wheels are turning to get them into other suburbs where one would be much appreciated, like Point Chevalier.

    There is a market on May Rd Mt Roskill, but I think it's Friday mornings, possibly Tuesday mornings as well, but I know it's local 'fresh fruit and veg cos I've eaten the evidence. :)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    (Dunedin, for the geographically challenged)

    Now, that would be a good bumper sticker. ;-)

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

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