Hard News by Russell Brown

Read Post

Hard News: The fake news problem

448 Responses

First ←Older Page 1 6 7 8 9 10 18 Newer→ Last

  • Kumara Republic, in reply to Tom Semmens,

    I have not heard a single corporate MSM entity talk about war weariness in America or about the human consequences of endless war and the possibility the an American population that is war weary voted to end war.

    Trump is no pacifist. More likely he’s a reactionary isolationist in the vein of Henry Ford and Charles Lindbergh who were known sympathisers of European Fascism in the 1930s.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5439 posts Report Reply

  • Trevor Nicholls, in reply to Kumara Republic,

    Trump is no pacifist. More likely he’s a reactionary isolationist

    Trump needs to win, or at least to appear to win. If he can't bully you he will have someone fight you.

    Wellington, NZ • Since Nov 2006 • 324 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Kumara Republic,

    I think his widely-predicted appointment of the utterly batshit General Michael Flynn as national security adviser suggests a literally unprecedented period of American foreign aggression. American Conservative on the book Flynn published this year:

    Flynn’s specific recommendations seem to involve endless warfare against what he calls the “the terror armies, above all in the Middle East and Libya,” which would commit the U.S. to an unknown number of conflicts for the foreseeable future that would only be concluded when we “win.” In other words, Flynn offers a recipe for perpetual war in predominantly Muslim countries, and if we take his rhetoric about the “enemy coalition” seriously he may be talking about waging wars in other parts of the world as well. His willingness to blur distinctions between disparate and mutually hostile groups suggests that the U.S. would find itself fighting multiple enemies at the same time. Flynn also thinks that the U.S. should “clearly and forcefully attack their crazy doctrines,” which credits our government with a degree of competence and cultural understanding that it has not demonstrated in decades. The U.S. could denounce various foreign leaders as “false prophets,” as Flynn suggests, but why would anyone inclined to listen to these “false prophets” care what Washington said about them? Likewise, “insisting on the superiority of our own political vision” is all very well, but it would achieve nothing except to intensify resentment against the U.S.

    The belief in Trump as an anti-war candidate is a particularly feeble fairy story.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22843 posts Report Reply

  • andin,

    Since when has Trump indicated he’ll end the war? Since fucking when?

    He has just subliminally put it out all along, he would whip everyone's (the whole world that isnt 'merican) arse. Great foreign policy BTW not!
    And then there'd be no more need for war 'cause They'd be the undisputed champions!
    Cue Freddie...

    And swathes of people fell for this subtext. How dumb can you be...
    Anyway Obama has nicely suggested globalization needs a reset(does it have that button?) doing himself no favours here, He only realizes that now?
    Im sorry, but sometimes any number of us completely lose the plot, but when its those with hands on the levers of power it is just farcical and dangerous.

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1890 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    The Washington Post's The Intersect column interviews "the OG of fake news", Paul Horner.

    My sites were picked up by Trump supporters all the time. I think Trump is in the White House because of me. His followers don’t fact-check anything — they’ll post everything, believe anything. His campaign manager posted my story about a protester getting paid $3,500 as fact. Like, I made that up. I posted a fake ad on Craigslist.

    He feels regretful.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22843 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Russell Brown,

    Crooked pillory....

    He feels regretful.

    LOCK HIM UP!!!

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7948 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green, in reply to Kumara Republic,

    the futility of war.

    It has been tempting to think that most of Europe had learned similarly. But there seem to be fractious elements there also. And secession in the area is already evident. Some might say annexation.

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green, in reply to andin,

    any number of us completely lose the plot

    http://pickeringpost.com/cartoon/6629

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • Neil,

    It's not just the obviously fake news which is an issue.

    The Podesta emails weren't exactly fake but the way they were presented was dishonest.

    They were released to undermine Clinton and sow animosity amongst Sanders supporters. But because they weren't fake that allowed Wikileaks and their apologists like Greenwald to disingenuously claim this was journalism.

    This hacking business isn't really leading to greater transparency, it's lead to Trunp.

    Since Nov 2016 • 380 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green, in reply to nzlemming,

    a bridge.

    I'm wondering whether I was positing the existence of alternative placements of the abutments.

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green, in reply to Neil,

    greater transparency,

    I heard that we had reached peak transparency. Was that fake news?

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green, in reply to Rich Lock,

    zero.

    O'K I'll confess to not reading at Veterans Today very often.

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • Neil,

    I wonder about the psychology of the need to dress up attacks on Clinton and other Dems as some sort of heroic journalistic balance.

    The ploy is to present selective, out of context information then claim it proves Clinton is a lying, warmongering, Bernie hating neoliberal. Then turn around and claim not to be campaigning against her but oh by the way she's very unpopular don't you know.

    It's an interesting charade.

    Since Nov 2016 • 380 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green, in reply to Neil,

    dress up attacks

    Uniforms are popular with partisans. It is good to appear dashing.

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • Dennis Frank,

    I spent a while last night reading Russell's report on fake news & the commentaries and I endorse his analysis & share his concern. I made news & current affairs stories in the TVNZ newsroom for a decade. Working with journalists & reporters does inform one of the prevalent syndromes governing msm interpretation of political events: the primary bias requires them to toe the establishment line. Some hew to the left side of that line, some to the right.

    As an anti-establishment '60s rebel I learnt to be diplomatic in alerting them to significant subtle dimensions of situations (with eventual gratifying results). Banality & vapidity are no longer the norm they were up until the late '80s. TVNZ political reoortage errs obviously nowadays mostly in uncritical acceptance and recycling of biased stories from overseas - such as that designed to help the Democrat candidate.

    The solution to the fake news problem would, in principle, require a suitable clause in a media charter. I believe the media convention that requires balanced reporting is enforced by management of large media orgs to the extent that public perception of fairness is maintained - by and large. Fake news therefore proliferates at the margins, where a free market fosters enterprising media in search of a resonating audience. The danger is sociopathy generated by a shared perception that snowballs so well that it simulates reality for a politically decisive sector of the electorate. That's how Hitler became a dictator.

    New Zealand • Since Jun 2016 • 292 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green, in reply to Russell Brown,

    I think he is boasting. Fake news rules!

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green,

    Dear Russell, sorry to hear that you missed my “memo” ; late October I think it was.
    The actual circumstances remain tolerably “unclear”. Nobody seems to know what happened in the end . But it does seem that Hilary may have been running to catch a bus.
    Still, as the saying goes – “it’s an ill wind . . . ” (wink, wink).
    The odds offered by Jetbet on a Trump win certainly were stupendous just prior to my “memo” ; trust you got your share.
    Best
    Rupert

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • mpledger, in reply to Farmer Green,

    Fake news and trolls spouting incoherent nonsense. We once hoped for better things from the internet.

    Since Oct 2012 • 97 posts Report Reply

  • mark taslov, in reply to Rich Lock,

    That was a very pointed response to Greer via Tom Rich, I think comments are still open on Greer’s piece, you might like to challenge him directly on his reasons for voting as he did, all things considered it was Greer’s opinion that Tom was commenting on. As with Obamacare in that piece I linked to:

    "Relatively few people will feel the premium increases, but everyone will hear about them,” said Dan Mendelson, president of Avalere Health, a consulting firm. “That will have an effect on the perception of the program."

    The fake news problem is one thing, fake news in an election is another thing entirely, just ask that “conspiracy theorist” Nicky Hager. Perception trumps fact in an election. ruinous defamatory pamphlets and flyers have graduated to the net.

    One thing a Trump supporter said to me was that she felt that these alarming snippets quoted by a pliant media were in contrast to the general tone of what Trump said at his rallies. I’m not going to wade through any recordings to challenge that, perception being what it is inside and outside a bubble.

    Having said that I am intrigued and do desire to get a better understanding as to why individuals voted the way they did, I see little value – when presented with testimony of someone’s reasons for casting their vote – in disregarding that testimony because it doesn’t account for facts or it’s something I can’t wrap my head around yet.

    The thing that surprised me most about Trump's campaign was the extent to which he appeared to be adlibbing in this age where everything is recorded.

    Te Ika-a-Māui • Since Mar 2008 • 2281 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green, in reply to mpledger,

    Sorry. It’s a meme that is abroad in regard to the role of media in influencing elections. Apologies if it was out of place here.
    It was just my interpretation of media commentary in the last few weeks of the campaign. It was my perception that Hilary had been thrown under the bus, and it was a Murdoch publication which appeared to have changed horses . We discussed it at home at the time , and having looked up the odds, were enthusiastic about the potential.
    There was no intention to offend.

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green, in reply to mark taslov,

    he appeared to be adlibbing

    I only know Trump from Doonesbury cartoons of a decade or so ago, but I gather that he sells himself well. It's not easy for an insincere person to ad lib because he has to think what to say ; it's easier to ad lib when you're speaking from the heart.
    He wouldn't be a bad salesman.

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to mpledger,

    Fake news and trolls spouting incoherent nonsense. We once hoped for better things from the internet.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • mark taslov, in reply to Farmer Green,

    It’s not easy for an insincere person to ad lib because he has to think what to say ; it’s easier to ad lib when you’re speaking from the heart.

    That sounds uncharacteristically emotive, I think it’s just a skill people have and can develop: Trump ran as a glorified shock jock.

    Te Ika-a-Māui • Since Mar 2008 • 2281 posts Report Reply

  • Dennis Frank, in reply to mark taslov,

    Mark, I agree that his propensity to shock came across as the style you mention, and you could even liken his speeches to the anti-establishment voters as tossing bits of red meat to a pack of hyenas - but the farmer is right also.

    Speaking from the heart is a sign of authenticity - a quality that often proves essential to the success of political contenders. [I wish the Greens would learn this and reconnect to their traditional voter base accordingly.] I think the stylist is just the front the guy feels he must use to play the democracy game well, and the real Trump shows in his words.

    Joe Bennett, on the RNZ panel today, commented that his self-contradictions prove that he has no beliiefs. A very good point. Yet human nature is often like that and politicians being all things to alll people has long been known to be typical and is often seen as the key to political success. I get the impression Trump just blurts out what seems the best thing to say at the time. It worked a treat, so we could draw an obvious conclusion. Tactical genius. I'd rather wait & see if he replicates it on the global stage - when in office.

    New Zealand • Since Jun 2016 • 292 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock, in reply to mark taslov,

    That was a very pointed response to Greer via Tom Rich, I think comments are still open on Greer’s piece, you might like to challenge him directly on his reasons for voting as he did, all things considered it was Greer’s opinion that Tom was commenting on.

    More blunt than pointed, but yeah.

    The thing is this, though: I've already spent more time than I should researching and commenting on this type of stuff, and it's beginning to draw time away from various other aspects of my life. Which is a micro-example of the macro problem.

    To paraphrase a quote generally attributed to Winston Churchill, "a lie gets liked and shared half a million times before the truth has a chance to get its pants on."

    Farting out a good made-up story that's based on a half-truth or misinterpretation, that 'feels' right, takes very little time, and spreads like a virus. A decent rebuttal, which involves carefully unpicking the strands of it - doing the research, finding the original sources, deconstructing the argument - takes ten times as long, and reaches 1/10th of the audience. There's a lot of time and effort involved, speaking from personal experience.

    There are swarms of people literally paid to make up shit - kids in Macedonia, the 'fancy bear' organisation in Russia, Fox News, Breitbart, Alex Jones, The Daily Mail.

    How does one go about countering that?

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

First ←Older Page 1 6 7 8 9 10 18 Newer→ Last

Post your response…

Please sign in using your Public Address credentials…

Login

You may also create an account or retrieve your password.