Up Front by Emma Hart

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Up Front: The C Word

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  • Megan Wegan,

    And my, don't they get irritated?

    Welly • Since Jul 2008 • 1275 posts Report Reply

  • Bryan Dods,

    Hey! I just got back on thread and Matthew goes and mentions Mayflower.

    Did I tell you about the Triumph Mayflower which was a model from the 1950s that was powered by a 4 cylinder engine that was very similar to the one that..........
    Oh! never mind.

    Northland • Since Nov 2006 • 46 posts Report Reply

  • JLM,

    Bryan, you obviously chose the right answer to the question in the AQ scale in David's thread about being able to know when it's time to stop a conversation : ).

    Come and talk Triumphs to my husband sometime...

    Judy Martin's southern sl… • Since Apr 2007 • 240 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    The one good thing about British cars is they are so easy to work on. This fact is handy because it is something you will find yourself doing every weekend.
    Japanese cars, on the other hand, are like working on a space shuttle with added spaghetti and chips. However, this is not a disadvantage as by the time they break down you have forgotten how to use your opposable thumbs.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    The one good thing about British cars is they are so easy to work on. This fact is handy because it is something you will find yourself doing every weekend.

    This certainly applied to the Vitesse in question. The only time I remember it not being in pieces was just before he sold it.

    "FENdltin" instead of "fenDAHLton".

    There is certainly an element of Suburb snobbery in operation round central Auckland. Often due to arbitrarily drawn school zones. People still have a hard time understanding why we moved from Mt Albert to Sandringham, with our decile 5 school, when others had moved away to avoid it. Long story, but overall we are totally happy we did. Having Voila and Satya round the corner doesn't hurt either.

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    People still have a hard time understanding why we moved from Mt Albert to Sandringham, with our decile 5 school, when others had moved away to avoid it. Long story, but overall we are totally happy we did. Having Voila and Satya round the corner doesn't hurt either

    Good move, Sandringhamstan is so much more cosmopolitan.I love the area and I assure you nothing hurts there. Was thinking. If you want me to get the parts you need for your atomic baby in Sydney. Need to know by next Friday. Happy to.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    Thanks Sofie. It's just the rubber seals really. Although the inside is in pretty bad shape. Oxidised aluminium. Eww! Will email you, as I am considering selling. This is the no steamer model, JTBC.

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    I am detecting disappointment from t'other half (bloody librans) with the news of no steamer. So if you want seals send mail. If you want to berid the one with steamer, send mail. :)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    There is certainly an element of Suburb snobbery in operation round central Auckland. Often due to arbitrarily drawn school zones. People still have a hard time understanding why we moved from Mt Albert to Sandringham, with our decile 5 school, when others had moved away to avoid it. Long story, but overall we are totally happy we did. Having Voila and Satya round the corner doesn't hurt either.

    Bloody ridiculous, isn't it? Your local school happens to be a very good one. And I can remember the days when Gladstone was out of fashion. It doesn't only go on in the inner suburbs either. Many of the parents at our kindergarten choose for their children to go to one of the 3 schools in Mangere Bridge, and just as many choose for their kids to go all the way to Onehunga, instead of going to any of the local Mangere schools. Elitism is alive and well, wherever you go.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3136 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    (sigh)
    Plan B: wins Big Wednesday, afterwards, ditto-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Now: let's just totally total bloody McClay-

    what a disgusting object.

    Please note I resisted any rogering suggestion-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Poole,

    Islander, I'm more disgusted that Granny is asserting that he's not going to go to prison. What a pathetic country we are, when you can rip off charities and the taxpayer in a manner that could attract a seven-year jail sentence and still not see the inside of a cell. No wonder we have problems with white-collar crime.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2007 • 4097 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Judge Doogue said a sentence of a "significant time of community work" would be more appropriate than prison or home detention because of McClay's background.

    Background!. So he gets appropriate community work (of which he was supposed to be doing in the fucking first place.)And what will that be? Some cushy little number in his son's office, that we pay for?
    This man stole, knowingly from the mouths of the babes.What a fucknuckle. And, we are told solo parents are the bludgers. Grrr :(

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    Islander, I'm more disgusted that Granny is asserting that he's not going to go to prison. What a pathetic country we are, when you can rip off charities and the taxpayer in a manner that could attract a seven-year jail sentence and still not see the inside of a cell. No wonder we have problems with white-collar crime.

    As far as the Granny and others are concerned, "crime" is only committed by the lumpenproletariat.

    @Jackie C: how long will it be before we get our equivalent of Brown vs Board of Education? I've also detected what appears to be an emerging gulf between higher-decile "voluntary/model minorities" and lower-decile "involuntary minorities".

    "Auckland Grammar headmaster John Morris was ordered to stand aside by members of the NZ Army as they escorted several mostly Maori and Pacific Island students to their first day at the prestigious college..."

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5420 posts Report Reply

  • Tim Michie,

    Meanwhile others are supposedly receiving appropriate financial support to raise a child, train off welfare and lose frightening amounts of weight.

    Auckward • Since Nov 2006 • 614 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    One of those two cases - tie-wearing thief or student mum beneficiary - is clearly being "ambishus" in the approved form. Good to know.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19688 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie,

    This man stole, knowingly from the mouths of the babes.

    Insofar as it was public money, yes he did.
    Anyone remember Keith Hancox, who was jailed in the early 90s for embezzling a whack of corporate dosh from the Sports Foundation? While the relative amounts stolen might have some bearing on the kind of sentences, mainstream opinion at the time of Hancox's jailing was that robbing corporates was a lesser offence than stealing from the public purse.

    Around the time of Hancox's sentencing I recall the case of an associate of a common crim being given jail time for his part in a spending spree around the South Island with his criminal buddy. His mate had turned up with a bunch of stolen credit cards and invited him along. While the judge observed that Mr. Common Crim had no part in the original thefts, knowingly partaking of ill-gotten gains was a jailable offence. Curiously enough there was never any suggestion of punishing Keith Hancox's wife, who for years had enjoyed a lavish lifestyle funded by hubby's financial hijinks. One law for them, etc.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4591 posts Report Reply

  • George Darroch,

    Many of the parents at our kindergarten choose for their children to go to one of the 3 schools in Mangere Bridge, and just as many choose for their kids to go all the way to Onehunga, instead of going to any of the local Mangere schools. Elitism is alive and well, wherever you go.

    I felt really bad for deserting Mangere College and choosing Onehunga High - but decades of problems shovelled onto the local school weren't going to be fixed by me, unfortunately. I did spend a year and a bit in the early 90s at the wonderful Koru Primary, which was an example of how to get things right in a poor neighbourhood.

    WLG • Since Nov 2006 • 2264 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    Ah, Mangere College. Had it's problems, and yes, many of the older kids round here either go to Onehunga High or Marcellin College. Some of them because they choose to, themselves.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3136 posts Report Reply

  • Dinah Dunavan,

    It is so frustrating to arrive late to one of Emma's posts and the following discussion. I blame the hot weather we are having in Washington and the G&Ts.

    The up-turned collar thing has been around for a very long time, read Georgette Heyer for good descriptions of Regency collars.

    Then turn to John Hughes in the 80s. 'Pretty in Pink', or 'The Breakfast Club' for two examples. You'll see so many up-turned collars you'll want to have one yourself. Interestingly it is not the posh kids with up-turned collars.

    I always thought up-turned collars went with Ivy League preppy kids bounding off to the yacht or tennis court with their white shirt collars turned up and a pastel sweater artfully tied around their shoulders.

    Sloan Rangers seem to go in for the up-turned collar too. Maybe that harks back to Regency days.

    Of course in middle aged Parnell/Karori women it might be to hide the wrinkly neck.

    Dunedin • Since Jun 2008 • 186 posts Report Reply

  • 3410,

    Then turn to John Hughes in the 80s. 'Pretty in Pink', or 'The Breakfast Club' for two examples. You'll see so many up-turned collars you'll want to have one yourself.

    If you trace back all the 'retro' fads of recent decades, you'll remember that the late '70s / early '80s spawned something of a '50s revival, and the popped collar thing of the time I think stems from that.

    Auckland • Since Jan 2007 • 2618 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    Hopefully this is the clip I think it is. I'm flying blind due to firewall issues.

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • icehawk,

    Individual income is not a great indicator of class / socio-economic group. So NRT's figures are valuable, but the more interesting one is household income after tax.

    Even then it's dodgy. Part of what Emma is seeing is that income tends to rise with age.

    Which relates to confusion about social mobility. Someone who works in the uni bookshop part-time age 25 while finishing their MBA may be a highly-paid CEO aged 50, that doesn't mean NZ has high social mobility. Comparisons of parental income with childrens income shows much less movement than tracing simple individual income mobility over a few decades.

    Also class relates much more to wealth than to income. I'm ludicrously rich by my standards. Absolutely bloody rolling in it. I earn close to 4 times median income in NZ, and on a good year I've earned more. But that wouldn't get me a house in Mt Vic or Roseneath - a $1.5M house in Mt Victoria costs 65 times median income in NZ.

    Wellington • Since Sep 2008 • 49 posts Report Reply

  • icehawk,

    a $1.5M house in Mt Victoria costs 65 times median income in NZ.

    Let me be clearer to avoid pedants:

    A $1.5M house in Mt Victoria costs 65 times median income of a taxpayer in NZ.

    But not all taxpayers earns wages and salaries as many are retired, or full-time students without a part-time job, or etc.

    A $1.5M house in Mt Victoria costs only 40 times median income of a taxpaying wage or salary earner in NZ.

    And to be fair to Mt Vic, it has some tiny little 3-bdr cottages on tiny sections that go for as little as 25 times median income of a taxpaying NZ wage/salary earner. Aren't we the egalitarian society?

    Wellington • Since Sep 2008 • 49 posts Report Reply

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