Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: On the Clark candidacy

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  • Bart Janssen, in reply to Sacha,

    um, Whanau Ora

    It is possible that The Maori Party is neither everything to all Maori nor nothing to any Maori.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 4458 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Semmens, in reply to Sacha,

    Whanau Ora only got traction because it provided the National party with a perfect trial for privatising welfare and education services to unaccountable cronies in everything from housing to charter schools to the unemployed. Enabling corruption by giving the right a precedent for handing out public money to your mates is hardly something to be proud of.

    Sevilla, Espana • Since Nov 2006 • 2214 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Bart Janssen,

    But the refusal to endorse Ms Clark came from a political party that would like to be seen as representing ALL Maori.

    And Ms Clark, whose work experience outside of academia consists pretty much of a holiday job in Jim Anderton's dairy, led the Labour party to multiple victories. Should we be invoking the Fair Trading Act to protect the terminally credulous?

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Bart Janssen,

    It is possible that The Maori Party is neither everything to all Maori nor nothing to any Maori.

    Something like that. My impression is that politically-aware Maori want the party to be there and see it as representing something important – even if they're not going to vote for it.

    I would reiterate my respect for both the co-leaders. Not so sure about Tuku Morgan, but it's not my party.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22825 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Hooton, in reply to Russell Brown,

    As Tim Watkin notes, Closing the Gaps was worked into a race issue by National

    I don't see Tim saying that. I see him saying that Helen Clark ditched Closing the Gaps, at least as a slogan. One of the reasons for the slogan being dropped is that many Maori leaders saw it as based on a deficit model - "why do you think our kids only want to be as good as your kids?" was one way it was put to me when I was working for the Treaty Tribes Coalition at the time.

    Particular offence was caused when Margaret Wilson - one of the appallingly arrogant ministers to serve in any government, red or blue - wrote new principles for settling historic treaty claims that included:

    The settlement of historical grievances also needs to be understood within the context of wider government policies that are aimed at restoring and developing the Treaty relationship - for example, the Government's "Closing the Gaps" programme and the development of policy to address contemporary claims.

    This was seen as outrageous because it delegitimised historic grievances - that if a particular iwi's children were doing well at school or in health statistic etc this would somehow mean the historic injustices were less worthy of being addressed by the Crown.

    I really don't think the Helen Clark had the same sort of natural connection with Maori (at least those with a more traditional outlook) that Jim Bolger had, and which John Key has developed or at least learned to fake. I think this may have something to do with the fact that the place of Maori in New Zealand doesn't really fit into Clark's European social democratic outlook.

    In contrast, I think a conservative provincial Catholic farmer like Bolger can think "so what you're talking about is your connection with the land, family values, spirituality and property rights" - and while this is far from being a full account of Maori beliefs it is an easier starting point than European social democracy.

    Anyway, these are just some reflections from the time. I just wouldn't assume that Closing the Gaps was on one side of the ledger from the perspective of all Maori and the Foreshore & Seabed and "haters and wreckers" on the other.

    Auckland • Since Aug 2007 • 194 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Hooton, in reply to Bart Janssen,

    I don’t like the way The Maori Party pretends to represent all Maori

    I haven't seen actual data on this, but looking at overall results it seems very likely to me that more Maori people give their party vote to the National Party than to the Maori Party - and of course overwhelmingly more Maori people give their party vote to the Labour Party than to either National or the Maori Party.

    Auckland • Since Aug 2007 • 194 posts Report Reply

  • andin, in reply to Matthew Hooton,

    outrageous because it delegitimised historic grievances

    Is that a word? delegitimised? So she twisted words to suit her own goals. Wow!
    It has a great history this kind of behaviour, what more can I say.

    I think this may have something to do with the fact that the place of Maori in New Zealand doesn’t really fit into Clark’s European social democratic outlook.

    Oh really? You think because of her upbringing and life experience, as defined by you, would be a blind spot in her ability to understand another’s way of looking at life specifically Maori? Um.. she was born here.. dont know if it counts for much in your world.

    In contrast, I think a conservative provincial Catholic farmer like Bolger can think “so what you’re talking about is your connection with the land, family values, spirituality and property rights”

    While his teeth clacked.
    Got worse when he drank.
    Dont play partisan games please.

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1890 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand, in reply to andin,

    I agree with Andin. Matthew is floating a bunch of half-baked assumptions about Helen Clark's life. She was born and nurtured in a farming family in Te Pahu, in a very rural corner of the Waikato.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2557 posts Report Reply

  • martinb,

    Well before the listing ‘shock’ I read this from Audrey Young in the paper:

    Audrey Young column July16

    It seemed fairly clear: Clark wasn’t the U.S. pick, she wasn’t the European pick and she wasn’t from Eastern Europe whose ‘turn’ it was. Even Australia wasn’t clear about supporting her.

    Despite us wanting the narrative to be the little country that can, underdog story, it would seem that the factors above were ignored by headline writers and it created unrealistic expectations.

    Auckland • Since Jul 2010 • 206 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Matthew Hooton,

    I really don't think the Helen Clark had the same sort of natural connection with Maori (at least those with a more traditional outlook) that Jim Bolger had...

    Talk about Myths & Legends of the Grammar Zone. In the lead-up to the 2005 election, when Clark presumably allowed herself to be spooked by the idiots' auction of Maori-bashing driven by Don Brash's enablers, National's sole Maori MP was stripped of her Maori Affairs portfolio. Along with prompting the hapless Brash on the parliamentary requirements of when to sit, stand and genuflect, that empathetic son of the soil Gerry Brownlee also found time to revive the quaint notion of the white man's burden by shouldering the Maori Affairs portfolio.

    The Foreshore and Seabed Act was Clark's solution to having drawn the short straw in the deliberately poisoned post-election race relations atmosphere. The resulting fallout ensured that no political party would attempt such a blatant post-colonial asset grab again in the foreseeable.

    Clark may have been sidelined by history on that score, but so were those who put Brash up to the Orewa speech. Both they and Clark misread the mood of the electorate. One could argue that Clark's parental condescension towards Maori might have been a lesser evil than the cynical appeal to the worst in people that was channeled through poor old Brash. Claiming some kind of moral high ground by pretending that Bolger was part of a similar paternalistic tradition shows that you've learnt nothing from the debacle.

    .

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    Margaret Wilson was one of the cleverest and most courageous political leaders we have ever had, whether as party president, Minister or Speaker, and a brilliant legal brain. She probably threatened mediocre male MPs more than any other woman MP. She just did not play their games. Not surprising the comments upthread.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3214 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Hooton, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    The Foreshore and Seabed Act was Clark’s solution to having drawn the short straw in the deliberately poisoned post-election race relations atmosphere.

    You have your timing wrong on this. Clark announced her intention to legislate in 2003 when English was still National leader. The Bill was passed in 2004. Here is a history of the issue one of my staff wrote in 2010 for a newsletter:
    http://media.nzherald.co.nz/webcontent/document/pdf/Hooton%20paper%20Foreshore%20and%20Seabed.pdf

    Auckland • Since Aug 2007 • 194 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Matthew Hooton,

    You have your timing wrong on this. Clark announced her intention to legislate in 2003 when English was still National leader. The Bill was passed in 2004. Here is a history of the issue one of my staff wrote in 2010 for a newsletter:

    Thank you. Hindsight certainly is a wonderful thing. Nevertheless you don't appear to have felt the need to take issue with Russell Brown when he stated upthread:

    National at the time want to legislate over all rights. And they very, very nearly got the chance to do so. Had Brash become PM things would’ve got very serious.

    Further to your claim of Jim Bolger exemplifying some kind of pastoral empathy with Maori "values" - perhaps there's some truth in that, insofar as Bolger represented the fag end of an arrangement where vested elites found accomodation with one another's interests. This kind of thing, for example. That only begs the question, why did such cosy accommodations unravel so nastily under Brash?

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Rosemary McDonald, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    ....mediocre...

    Excellent description.

    Waikato, or on the road • Since Apr 2014 • 1344 posts Report Reply

  • linger, in reply to Rosemary McDonald,

    Colour fool descriptions
    Used for those with several feet of clay,
    mediocre lies among the earthier tones,
    midway between yellow ochre and faecal madder.

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1923 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz,

    Doesn’t the Marine and Coastal Area (Takutai Moana) Act basically reimplement the Foreshore and Seabed Act, except with a name partly in Te Reo, which is of course enough symbolism to keep the Maori Party happy? I don’t believe any iwi has acquired anything under this act.

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to linger,

    Attachment

    Colour fool descriptions

    I’m loving your start on this palette!
    There could be a whole NZ Hue’s Hue in it…

    stool life…
    I believe Julia Morison has already employed the wonderful and ‘reddily’ available ‘faecal madder’

    In many ways M(o)useings is a continuation of Morison’s Kabalistic and Alchemical interests in the 1980s and ‘90s. The Alchemist dedicates themselves to the philosophical transmutation of base materials into gold. Her 1985 work Hermes used both excrement and gold, Te Papa has her Vademecum of 1986, Auckland Art Gallery has her Ten of 1997, and Christchurch Art Gallery holds within its collection her 1998 Excrement/Gold – an abstract diptych half gold leaf and half sealed dog faeces – God and Dog, the Sacred and Profane. In 2000 Julaine Stephenson parodied this work in the High Street Liftspace with her Harpic/Brasso. The Kabala connection suggests the shit is simultaneously the clay from which both Adam and Golem are made, and the baseness that is left behind once the mystical idea has been digested. Excrement is one of the sacred Sephirothic elements of the Kabala frequently used by Julia in earlier works along with lead, ash, clay, blood, mercuric salts, silver, gold and the ethereal represented by acrylic.

    Read more: http://eyecontactsite.com/2012/06/going-through-the-motions#ixzz4GOHT9goS

    from the mixing desk…
    May I expand on the mediaochre
    defined by its ready ‘brown nosing’ and achieved by mixing ‘Yellow press’ with ‘Red tops’.

    let the hue and cry begin!
    Start your prism sentences here…
    there’s a whole reignbow to chromakey!
    …perhaps even a ‘Pain-tone Matching System’?

    :- )

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7943 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Hooton, in reply to Rich of Observationz,

    That is deeply cynical. And pretty much exactly right!

    Auckland • Since Aug 2007 • 194 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    Toby Manhire nails his fine opinion theses to the doors of perception
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/politics/news/article.cfm?c_id=280&objectid=11687449

    and as that other great uniting of nations kicks off this weekend here's Clarke & Dawe's nailing of the Australian hopes;
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-28/clarke-and-dawe:-australians-to-watch-in-rio/7669290

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7943 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    I'd like to know how the UN is going to deal with Mars, and the other celestial body's. There is this outfit that's bugging the UN for land rights out there, as a way the pressure them into drawing up a treaty. All the $1 blocks are sold, but there are some tidy volcanic cones up for grabs.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4411 posts Report Reply

  • Dennis Frank,

    Looks like support for HC's candidacy is ebbing at the UN...
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/politics/news/article.cfm?c_id=280&objectid=11688342

    The Maori Party critique of her past performance seems totally valid to me. Her handling of the foreshore & seabed issue seemed incompetent at the time and nothing has happened since to validate it.

    The woman is merely a mainstreamer. Good enough to be a semi-plausible prime minister on some issues while out of her depth on others. I suspect those participating in the UN votes have sussed her out.

    New Zealand • Since Jun 2016 • 292 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Dennis Frank,

    The woman is merely a mainstreamer. Good enough to be a semi-plausible prime minister on some issues while out of her depth on others. I suspect those participating in the UN votes have sussed her out.

    What the Clark government did do comparatively well was to encourage education. I watched indigenous people growing in self esteem at northland polytechnic during the first half of 2000. And I learned about the great migration.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4411 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to Dennis Frank,

    The woman is merely a mainstreamer. Good enough to be a semi-plausible prime minister on some issues while out of her depth on others. I suspect those participating in the UN votes have sussed her out.

    Jesus Christ, I don't think even her bitterest political enemies in NZ find her mediocre! She's headed the UNDP since 2009. That's a very big freaking deal.

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3891 posts Report Reply

  • Rosemary McDonald, in reply to Lilith __,

    She’s headed the UNDP since 2009.

    And most (including her Maori Party detractors...before...) say she's made a damn fine fist of the job.

    Methinks Dennis actually believes that the next Boss of the UN will be chosen on merit.

    Waikato, or on the road • Since Apr 2014 • 1344 posts Report Reply

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