Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: Christchurch: Is "quite good" good enough?

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  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to merc,

    you been paying rates for something but clean water it ain’t.

    She'll be right, the same bloke looking after your water is overseeing the Chchch recovery... what could possibly go worng?

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7948 posts Report Reply

  • Gregor Ronald, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    There's funky shopping in lots of little spots; Church Corner and inner Riccarton, Woolston, even Hornby. And Stanmore Rd is starting to revive - a bit.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 103 posts Report Reply

  • Gregor Ronald, in reply to James Caygill,

    In a city with fluid and evolving areas of use, fixed rail runs the risk of being in the wrong places. Buses are economical and green if done properly, and they can change their route in a minute - my (occasional) Metrostar takes a different route through St Albans every week!

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 103 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe,

    Does anyone else see a resemblance to the New Orleans disaster recovery model? Do we get a Brad Pitt with that?

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Lilith __,

    Imagine it over time being mainly vacant green space, then some apartments, playground, and commercial buildings scattered along the southern strip.

    That's if decision-makers don't later decide it's more lucrative to build something else there. Like carparks for the stadium, perhaps. Or a shopping mall.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19729 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Gregor Ronald,

    Buses are economical

    until fuel prices treble.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19729 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Sacha,

    Question for Chch locals: if I lived somewhere in the CBD or Frame areas, where would I most likely shop for food?

    It would be nice to see some public fruit trees in the frame, even community gardens. That's unlikely. So, you would shop at South City New World, Pak and Save, Piko in three or four years when it's back home.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Sacha,

    until fuel prices treble.

    Electric would be ideal for a flat city without huge distances to cover. Produced by a mandatory solar panel bank on all new buildings.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2899 posts Report Reply

  • andin, in reply to Hebe,

    It would be nice to see some public fruit trees in the frame, even community gardens

    Dont think any of the developers have studied Permaculture or heard of Davis California

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1890 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to Sacha,

    Imagine it over time being mainly vacant green space, then some apartments, playground, and commercial buildings scattered along the southern strip.

    OK. It's just hard to square that with what Key's been saying. (why am I trying?)

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3891 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to Sacha,

    Buses are economical

    until fuel prices treble.

    Trains need fuel too. And I’m not sure how economical trains are if they stop often. Most people getting around Chch are going relatively short distances. And you want stops to be reasonably close together for ease of use.

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3891 posts Report Reply

  • Gregor Ronald, in reply to Tom Semmens,

    Yes, there are brilliant riverside areas like this in Melbourne - apartments close to the river would be great, but there has to be a 50m-100m corridor between them and the river. First, to reduce lateral spreading in the next quake. Second, because living by the river is not the same as owning the river.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 103 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Lilith __,

    Trains need fuel too

    Trains and trams are easier to electrify. Electric vehicles also accelerate faster - so for instance, electrifying the Auckland rail network will allow more frequent services soon.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19729 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Lilith __,

    He's selling the final version to long-term investors.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19729 posts Report Reply

  • Keir Leslie, in reply to Sacha,

    Actually Sacha, I'm going to be quite blunt here and say that I don't particularly want to read your petty snarking about Tom here.

    I live in a city that's fucked, and you see it as a chance to score points in some weird argument about the proper way to understand leftism?

    Since Jul 2008 • 1452 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Keir Leslie,

    We all react differently to people being twats.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19729 posts Report Reply

  • Keir Leslie,

    Tom wasn't being a twat. You are. I just came home through the CBD and I just don't want to read a bunch of snide crap.

    Since Jul 2008 • 1452 posts Report Reply

  • Keir Leslie,

    In fact Tom's right, there does need to be some kind of thinking about what people want and the best way to make that happen, and it might not be as simple as just doing exactly the things they say. That's why town planning is a profession.

    Since Jul 2008 • 1452 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Keir Leslie,

    whatever

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19729 posts Report Reply

  • Keir Leslie,

    Eh, I don't want to pull the "I am from Christchurch" thing, but I am and you are not and I really dislike the way you used my broken city as a chance to have a go at Tom.

    Since Jul 2008 • 1452 posts Report Reply

  • Keir Leslie,

    I do have some actual remarks about the city plan now. I am really depressed at how much looks to be paid for by public-private partnerships. Hospital, the courts precinct, convention centre. Hotels to be exempted from height restrictions? Why? Either height restrictions are a good idea or they aren't. (I think they aren't.)

    I am also worried about the lack of any real civic ambition. The square is the heart of the city. Is a convention centre really the best thing to go there?

    To echo James Dann I am not happy about the siting of the stadium, a real kick in the teeth for NG's owners, who've done the right thing by the city.

    Realistically this plan is not particularly amazing, and is unlikely to last ten years as is. So I think we'll see a different city emerge than the one envisaged, although that's not to say that it won't be very influenced by this document.

    Obviously all at first glance.

    Since Jul 2008 • 1452 posts Report Reply

  • Keir Leslie,

    Also, and this will sound obviously, I think there's something quite weird and siloised about a plan drawn up within the Avenues. After all, Lancaster Park was never within that area. Why does the new stadium have to be? (Well, cynically, because that's where CERA's powers run strongest.)

    Since Jul 2008 • 1452 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz, in reply to merc,

    Put in fibre and de-centralise

    Except that:
    - 80% of people need to be physically at work for genuine reasons, like it's a shop/engineering works/hospital/bar
    - 15% of people could work from home, but no NZ boss trusts people they can't see sat at a desk
    - 4% work in software for companies that have embraced the 'agile' fad and require all their staff on site for regular f****n standup meetings
    - the other 1% are very fortunate indeed. Or unemployed.

    Then you've got shopping trips, visits to rellies and friends, meetings, etc. A de-centralised city isn't good for public transport, so everyone will wind up driving everywhere, until $5/$10 petrol drives them into penury.

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 5550 posts Report Reply

  • Keir Leslie,

    A de-centralised city is a 1962 city --- when do you think the decisions to put QEII out East, the University out West, etc, were made?

    Since Jul 2008 • 1452 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to Sacha,

    Trains and trams are easier to electrify. Electric vehicles also accelerate faster – so for instance, electrifying the Auckland rail network will allow more frequent services soon.

    We had battery-powered electric buses here in Chch -- our central-city shuttles were all electric. I have to say, rapid acceleration was not their forte, but perhaps technology has improved. Perhaps you're talking about trolley buses?

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3891 posts Report Reply

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