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Capture: Headland Sculpture on the Gulf 2015

19 Responses

  • Soon Lee,

    Thanks for the opportunity.

    By the way, that geometric sculpture? It's "Fragmented Interactions" by Gregor Kregar who is currently in the news.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 144 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Thank you. How much did the location affect your response to these works, you reckon?

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

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    Location was definitely a factor, and sometimes made a big difference. There was some very thoughtful placement. Part of it was like walking through an Enchanted Forest or should that be Enchanted Bush with the anticipation of seeing the sculptural surprise round the next bend. In the open headland portion, it was a field of sculptures. I especially liked the way the James Bond popped up in photos of other sculptures.

    "Field Apart" with the mirrored columns reflect the surroundings so your experience of it depends hugely on weather and how busy it is. We went on an overcast day, and I expect it will look different on a blue-sky day.

    "Sculpture Walk" was laid out parallel to the walking path which was a nice touch; they were doing what we were doing.

    We first saw "Landform" from the path, but cordoned-off. You could get close enough to touch or walk around the earlier sculptures but not this one. I felt unsatisfied by this one until later on when we got far enough away to look back & take in the whole.

    "Colonial Fence - a modern day tinker", the number 8 wire one had traffic issues for me: you had to wait your turn to walk past it & I didn't feel like I could linger because I'd be holding up the people behind me.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 144 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    “Field Apart” Angus Muir & Alexandra Heaney was my favourite. It’s 36 columns of mirrors & you get a different view with each step you take, not to mention when people walk around you or it.

    I think this work was installed at Splore last year. It's fabulous.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • mark taslov,

    Nice documenting Soon Lee, I had a wee chuckle at your description of the hold up at the traffic light. ‘Stop the Clock’ is my favorite.

    Te Ika-a-Māui • Since Mar 2008 • 2281 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    Lovely, thanks. I had heard about it so nice to see your photos. The dandelions look amazing on that hillside. How long is the sculpture walk there for?

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3226 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

    On daily until February 15.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 144 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

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    The Harbourview Sculpture Trail is open daily until the 28th. It's cheaper to get to than the Waiheke one (no ferry ride needed) & has more of a neighbourhood community vibe: includes pieces from local schools, and many of the sculptures are informed by the wetlands location & are also shout-outs to the local Te Atatu neighbourhood.

    "Reduce Reuse Recycle" Te Atatu Intermediate
    Look! It's the Auckland Harbour Bridge, and Sky Tower, using bottle tops.

    "Westree" Carolyn Lawrence
    Te Atatu is in West Auckland, geddit?

    "Playpill" Nicholas Mans
    This one's groovy and whimsical and serious all at the same time. You can push the pill gently to make it sway back & forth, but it's also about mental illness & the influence of pharmaceutical companies.

    More at my Flickr photoset.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 144 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

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    "flowerpower" Audrey Boyle
    From the Catalogue: "One hundred years ago, my great, great uncle William went off to WW1. The last sepia toned photo shows him standing among flowers, in which only the flowers have been coloured."

    "In the Bag: is enough enough?" Sally Kidall
    Another favourite. The location is tidal, and the tide was coming in when we visited so you could see the chair legs gradually getting submerged.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 144 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

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    Just one more...
    "Sway" Bev Goodwin & Jeff Thomson
    Kinetic, only a slight breeze is needed for the brightly painted wires sway & rotate.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 144 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Soon Lee,

    “Reduce Reuse Recycle”

    Chchch folk who want to make their own need go no further than Creative Junk in Disraeli street - they have the 'gears'...
    :- )

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to ,

    Ship shape...

    These are not finished art works, these photos.

    Love all those stacks of round port hole window glass (I assume).

    there must be a morphic resonance thing going on - I see the Sunday Star Times has a photo essay on a breaker beach in Gadani, Pakistan.

    Some years back I enjoyed the YA fiction book 'Ship Breaker' by Paolo Bacigalupi (whose other post-apocalyptic success was 'The Windup Girl' )

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

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    <aside>
    Sad to note the recent passing of Light Master Bill Culbert
    Set your photon blasters to stun!

    https://laurentdelaye.wordpress.com/publications/ *source
    </aside>

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to ,

    Morris dancing?

    William Morris would be delighted.

    He’s got a lot to answer for indeed, that William Morris.
    Him and his Pre-Raphaelite buddies…

    ;- )

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to ,

    This mighty oil painting of a ships last voyage during the 1830s.

    The Ship Turners?

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • andin, in reply to ,

    It is a Turner painting of it tho.

    " The most famous painting of Temeraire was made by J. M. W. Turner and titled The Fighting Temeraire tugged to her last Berth to be broken up, 1838. Turner depicts Temeraire on her last voyage, towed up the Thames by a small black steam tug as the sun sets (or dawns). In choosing his title Turner created an enduring appellation, as previously she had been known to her crew as the "saucy" Temeraire.[73][74] Turner presented it for exhibition at the Royal Academy in 1839 with an accompanying excerpt, slightly altered, of Thomas Campbell's poem Ye Mariners of England.[75]"
    From wikipedia

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1890 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to ,

    Turner used:
    “Genuine Ultramarine (Lapis Lazuli), White Lead and a very toxic yellow, Orpiment, also known as Kings Yellow or chemically, arsenic sulphide.”
    And I can’t even imagine all sorts of other toxic shit and asbestos.

    And he used to spit on the canvas too!
    (They've found dead crickets in Van Gogh's impasto as well!)
    Apparently it was the most popular painting as voted by the British people back in 2005.

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to ,

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    Aitch to oh!*
    I recently revised the 'Water Cycle' diagram for a CAFCA Watchdog cover, to address the NZ (and Chchch) situation - along with butterfly wings in the desert, I think there has to be some 'chaos effect' ramifications of removing water completely out of the local cycle, maybe not immediately, but as the say a small change in one state of a deterministic nonlinear system can result in large differences in a later state.....

    * i, j, k, l, m, n??

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7950 posts Report Reply

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