Access by Various artists

Read Post

Access: Autism: where have we come from and where are we going?

32 Responses

First ←Older Page 1 2 Newer→ Last

  • Sacha, in reply to B Jones,

    They've probably published more of it on the Education website

    Nope. No citations in any of the docs I checked here and here.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19680 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    There are 'recommendations for education for learners with ASD' in the new NZ ASD Guideline summary p. 12. There are a lot of good ones, graded according to the evidence base. However, none refer to cure or indicating that if you do them the child will be fixed.
    http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/new-zealand-autism-spectrum-disorder-guideline

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3196 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    Ta. From p84:

    There is a growing body of evidence that good quality early intervention results in positive outcomes for children with ASD 104, 194–198 (Recommendation 3.1.1). There is some evidence that children who participate in intensive intervention before the age of three have a significantly better outcome than those beginning after five years of age. 104, 197

    104. Lord C, McGee JP (eds). Educating Children with Autism. Washington DC: National Academy Press, 2001.

    197. Woods JJ, Wetherby AM. Early identification of and intervention for infants and toddlers who are at risk for autism spectrum disorder. Language, Speech & Hearing Services in the Schools 2003; 34(3):180-93.

    Hilary, you are more likely to know whether those references say early support reduces later need for support, rather than just improving personal and educational outcomes. Somehow I doubt it.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19680 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    There is nothing wrong, and probably a lot right with early intervention so long as it is sensible, done by professionals and not punitive or crazy (and a lot are). But it is hard to do RCTs with control groups as each child is different and will develop differently regardless. The point of interventions are that they will function better in the NT world. But that is also dependent on the world being inclusive and accepting. I know lots of families who spent a lot of time and money on ABA and their grown up children are just as diverse in their language skills, behaviour and sensitivities and other stuff as they were as children. We have no idea yet what interventions Hekia is thinking of and who will implement them and how much resource there will be for them. But I can guarantee that most autistic children will still require extra support throughout their educational lives.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3196 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    Latest post on the very good Autism and Oughtisms blog despairs about the lack of understanding about autism at schools as indicated in comments about children speaking with American accents

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3196 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    I have come across another influential person in the disability world (in the US and internationally) who came to the US as part of the diaspora escaping fascism. Gunnar Dybwad was a German-born US academic and social worker. He seems to have visited New Zealand several times from the late 1960s advocating for deinstitutionalisation, particularly for children, and disability rights.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2001/09/20/us/gunnar-dybwad-92-dies-early-advocate-for-the-disabled.html?_r=0

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3196 posts Report Reply

  • Rosemary McDonald,

    Waikato, or on the road • Since Apr 2014 • 1344 posts Report Reply

First ←Older Page 1 2 Newer→ Last

Post your response…

Please sign in using your Public Address credentials…

Login

You may also create an account or retrieve your password.